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New report for Northwest Arkansas Council focuses on gaps in training programs for workforce

By Brenda Bernet

This article was published August 22, 2016 at 1:00 a.m.

mike-rogers-agriculture-teacher-at-siloam-springs-high-school-talks-friday-about-the-equipment-checkout-system-used-for-students-at-the-career-academy-at-siloam-springs-high-school-the-system-allows-for-easy-restocking-of-supplies-and-works-in-a-similar-way-to-systems-used-by-local-employers

Mike Rogers, agriculture teacher at Siloam Springs High School, talks Friday about the equipment checkout system used for students at the Career Academy at Siloam Springs High School. The system allows for easy restocking of supplies and works in a similar way to systems used by local employers.

Denver Dishon, 17, a junior at Siloam Springs High School, practices welding with an arc welder Friday at the Career Academy at Siloam Springs High Sc...

Students exit the Career Academy Friday between classes at Siloam Springs High School.

Estimated annual hiring needs for skilled labor in Northwest Arkansas over next 10 years

• 4,100 in business occupations: customer service representatives and technical support; sales, finance, insurance and real estate; accountants, human resources and analysts; and managers

• 880 in transportation: warehouse, drivers and supervisors

• 800 in health fields: specialists, nurses, techs, aides and personal care

• 525 in education fields: teachers, college and university faculty, teaching assistants, substitute teachers and child care workers

• 425 in construction trades: plumbers, electricians, carpenters, equipment operators and concrete

• 400 in maintenance: mechanical, electronic, industrial and general maintenance

• 265 in production: machine operators and technicians, welders and machinists

• 240 in information technology: software and web developers, systems and network analysts, help desk support and database administrators

Source: Northwest Arkansas Council

Satisfying the demand for workers in business, the trades, manufacturing and production will take time, but a new study offers some hope, a regional workforce expert said.

Denver Dishon, 17, a junior at Siloam Springs High School, practices welding with an arc welder Friday at the Career Academy at Siloam Springs High Sc...

Students exit the Career Academy Friday between classes at Siloam Springs High School.

Estimated annual hiring needs for skilled labor in Northwest Arkansas over next 10 years

• 4,100 in business occupations: customer service representatives and technical support; sales, finance, insurance and real estate; accountants, human resources and analysts; and managers

• 880 in transportation: warehouse, drivers and supervisors

• 800 in health fields: specialists, nurses, techs, aides and personal care

• 525 in education fields: teachers, college and university faculty, teaching assistants, substitute teachers and child care workers

• 425 in construction trades: plumbers, electricians, carpenters, equipment operators and concrete

• 400 in maintenance: mechanical, electronic, industrial and general maintenance

• 265 in production: machine operators and technicians, welders and machinists

• 240 in information technology: software and web developers, systems and network analysts, help desk support and database administrators

Source: Northwest Arkansas Council

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Nodmcm says... August 22, 2016 at 5:23 a.m.

Maybe if they run out of workers, those rich businessmen might pay their workers a little more money. Now that wouldn't be so bad, would it, the idea of working folks making a little more money each year? Of course it is, because we all know that ALL of the increase in profits should go to the owners, not the workers. Its the Republican way, and if Northwest Arkansas is not a Republican nirvana, Arkansas grows no rice.

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