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Higher-ed agency unveils new way to fund colleges

Outcomes the focus, not enrollment

By Aziza Musa

This article was published June 8, 2016 at 5:50 a.m.

For the past few months, Arkansas' higher-education leaders have been toiling away at a complete redesign of the way the state funds its colleges and universities.

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Print Headline: Higher-ed agency unveils new way to fund colleges

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Comments on: Higher-ed agency unveils new way to fund colleges

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Displaying 1 - 8 of 8 total comments

ozena says... June 8, 2016 at 5:31 a.m.

"Transparent and inclusive" code for randomly opaque.

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hurricane46 says... June 8, 2016 at 9:29 a.m.

Bring in casinos and let them fund the colleges, after all a lot of Arkansans fund education in Oklahoma and Mississippi by gambling there, let's keep some of that money here.

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DoubleBlind says... June 8, 2016 at 9:53 a.m.

The logic is sound and long overdue, IMO. Colleges/Univs need to produce graduates who are able to find and fill available jobs - and should be funded according to their RESULTS. The real wild card here is that our high schools keep turning out students who are unprepared for college. If they can't read, write and speak above a 5th-6th grade level, that puts colleges at a serious disadvantage. They should maintain high entry standards; not lower them just to graduate someone. That's just proliferating the problem: an uneducated workforce. So a change to funding alone won't solve the core underlying issue: broken public K-12 schools.

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mrcharles says... June 8, 2016 at 11:49 a.m.

casinos are the work of the devil. learning by the devils money will only produce Deliverance type people, not that there is anything wrong that type who is the base of the ARk gop. Cant we just call them churches and use tax avoidance rules to make up shortages.

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Dontsufferfools says... June 8, 2016 at 12:55 p.m.

By the time Hutchison gets his second $100 million tax cut in place, there won't be any money to help fund higher-ed, and the tuition and fees will have to keep rising disproportionate to inflation. The governor and the GOP ledge are working on a starve the beast plan, in which revenue is strangled, surpluses dry up, and there is little money to improve education and infrastructure. It's the GOP way. Shrink government until it's small enough to drag to the bathtub and drown. That's why they all sign those pledges. The next governor is going to take over a mess.

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hurricane46 says... June 8, 2016 at 12:55 p.m.

How about this mrcharles, let's tax all the big churches in the state to help pay for education.

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Packman says... June 8, 2016 at 2:14 p.m.

Higher Ed needs a complete overhaul to be taken seriously. For example, any degree program that ends in the word "Studies" should not be eligible for public funding. Various offices on college campuses that exist for any other reason than academic instruction or financial assistance should be abolished, excepting the bare minimum needed for administrative duties. For example, public funds should not be spent on offices that facilitate identity politics.
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Until the public realizes just how bad they are being fleeced by academe, the cost of a college education will continue to grow. Colleges are places to learn and grow and engage in rigorous debate, and are not petri dishes for "social justice" experimentation to protect snowflakes.

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tommcdonald says... June 9, 2016 at 8:02 a.m.

Arkansas has historically ranked in the lower tier compared with other states in regard to the percentage of residents with a certificate or degree. At last count, the state ranked 45th in the nation, with 38.8 percent of its residents having earned certificates or higher, according to the Lumina Foundation, a private foundation working to increase the number of Americans who hold certificates or degrees.

Kudos for them to acknowledge that something needed to be changed

Quite simply all of the research reflects that the focus should be on advancing relevant, individual, student success outcomes, that result in sustained, individual student, performance improvement outcomes.

Since students = Institution Revenue and documented relevant student success outcomes means more new students, means more new revenue it's a circle of activity that only makes sense.

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