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Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 11:17 a.m.

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Day ends without an execution in Arkansas

By Eric Besson , Lisa Hammersly

This article was published April 18, 2017 at 9:00 a.m.

the-sun-sets-behind-clouds-over-an-arkansas-state-police-command-post-outside-the-varner-unit-near-grady-on-monday-evening-as-officials-await-word-on-the-status-of-an-execution-stay-for-condemned-inmate-don-davis

The sun sets behind clouds over an Arkansas State Police command post outside the Varner Unit near Grady on Monday evening, as officials await word on the status of an execution stay for condemned inmate Don Davis.

Print Headline: Day ends without an execution

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RBear says... April 18, 2017 at 6:47 a.m.

SCOTUS has now dealt another blow to the rushed execution process. The bottom line is that this showboating rushed schedule is creating more problems and costing more money for the state. If the state had just accepted the fact they didn't really have a decisive plan for carrying out executions and dropped back to get everything in line, we would not be in the headlines and this wouldn't be costing the state so much.
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Instead, they were using a drug that most states had rejected as the first drug in the 3-drug protocol due to botched executions in other states, the drug was about to expire, and they hadn't lined up a supply of another drug to replace it. Now we have the Keystone Cops equivalent of a justice system trying to meet a deadline. What has it gotten the state? Two executions delayed past the deadline and probably more to come.

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hah406 says... April 18, 2017 at 8:24 a.m.

Well, how about we not do that because we are not barbarians like ISIS and we don't torture prisoners. If the state is going to take a life, it should be done properly, with dignity, even though that is much more than the convicted gave their victims. It is what separates us from the barbarians in the middle east.

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Murphy01 says... April 18, 2017 at 9:24 a.m.

Will the victims families ever see justice carried out?

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hah406 says... April 18, 2017 at 9:38 a.m.

You are either an idiot, or you belong in prison with them for being a sociopath. The dignity isn't for them, it is for us. So that we, as a people, in taking a life, do not lose what makes us human the way the condemned did. Again, we don't torture people, but apparently you do or are ok with it. Of course there is that pesky Eighth Amendment, but you probably only like the constitution when you can cherry pick it.

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TravisBickle says... April 18, 2017 at 10:03 a.m.

I read the backgrounds of all these guys and I wish every one of the death penalty protesters would do the same. Almost to a man they have at least a murder or rape/kidnapping in their background before they did the crime for which they were sentenced to death. No redeeming social value that I could ascertain. Roll 'em up!

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AuntPetunia says... April 18, 2017 at 10:16 a.m.

Here is the list of countries that practice the death penalty. Looks like we are in good company among these nations known for their sense of Justice and public safety.

Afghanistan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Belarus, Botswana, China, Cuba, Egypt, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Japan, Jordan, North Korea, South Korea, Lebanon, Malaysia, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Tonga, United Arab Emirates, United States, Vietnam, Yemen

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purplebouquet says... April 18, 2017 at 10:35 a.m.

How does this back-and-forth over decades bring justice to the perpetrators, offer comfort and closure to the victims' families, inspire confidence in the legal system, serve as a deterrent to future criminals and represent a sensible use of public tax dollars?
A travesty in every regard.

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RBear says... April 18, 2017 at 11:19 a.m.

Since we have a bunch of justice seekers in here who promote ideas such as torching, maybe one of those seekers should remind the rest of us what our founders put forth in the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution. Furthermore, since one of those seekers recommends torching, remind us when in our nation's history that was deemed as acceptable punishment.
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We are a nation separated from others by our principles that were put forth at the founding. It's what makes us that beacon of freedom and justice many aspire to be a part of. However, some in here just seem to have missed that whole justice experience and would prefer we be akin to some of the more barbaric nations around the world. Why? Because it makes them look "tough."
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That point aside, all that's at stake here is getting it right, not getting it done. I've asked epeeking to speak to the issue of wrongfully convicted men/women on Death Row with no response. Why no response? I can only assume it's because it would dilute his "kill at any cost" argument.

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