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New UA dorms to be built with timber

By Jaime Adame

This article was published October 23, 2017 at 4:30 a.m.

a-rendering-of-the-new-university-of-arkansas-fayetteville-residence-hall-the-stadium-drive-residence-hall-the-hall-is-a-nearly-80-million-project-the-202000-square-foot-stadium-drive-residence-hall-which-will-consist-of-two-halls-connected-by-a-ground-level-common-area-is-the-first-us-campus-housing-project-built-using-whats-known-as-cross-laminated-timber-industry-experts-said

A rendering of the new University of Arkansas, Fayetteville residence hall, The Stadium Drive Residence Hall. The hall is a nearly $80 million project. The 202,000-square-foot Stadium Drive Residence Hall, which will consist of two halls connected by a ground-level common area, is the first U.S. campus housing project built using what’s known as cross-laminated timber, industry experts said.



FAYETTEVILLE -- A construction method rarely used in the United States underpins a new student housing project at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.



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Displaying 1 - 9 of 9 total comments

arkateacher54 says... October 23, 2017 at 6:12 a.m.

Makes sense to me - promote Arkansas timber industry by building a building out of European wood.

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NoUserName says... October 23, 2017 at 6:31 a.m.

And pay more for it than you would if using better quality materials. You can't make this stuff up...

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TimberTopper says... October 23, 2017 at 7:49 a.m.

Whomever is the head of this project needs to be fired like NOW! This is a fool Arkansas cannot afford.

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sadiedog12 says... October 23, 2017 at 10:23 a.m.

It's strange to me that considering the the UofA sitting on the edge of "tornado alley" opts to build their new dorms out of wood instead of steel . Putting the students at risk of being exposed to the glue used in the wood structure.

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HenryP says... October 23, 2017 at 2:04 p.m.

The timber industry needs no help with all the hurricane damage this year. What a stupid waste of money by my alma mater. Then again, not much surprises me anymore from the UofA clowns......

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Slak says... October 23, 2017 at 2:58 p.m.

The proglibs are Euro-centric. Give them a break, they can't help themselves.
A simple case of proglibery.

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Slak says... October 23, 2017 at 2:59 p.m.

Proglibery - the act of wasting other people's money.

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Popsmith says... October 23, 2017 at 4:13 p.m.

Laminated beams are fairly common. Cross laminating is something new and stronger.

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PeteKobelt says... October 24, 2017 at 4:30 p.m.

General replies to some misconceptions I noticed.

CLT is often less expensive than reinforced concrete and steel or reinforced CMU in a direct materials to material comparison. In that case the many attributes of the system usually far outweigh conventional methods. When the cost is higher, the business case for using mass timber relies on the secondary attributes like speed of build, seismic and wind resiliency and lower costs of operations (less energy to heat and cool). As one example, it is likely this building will be erected in 8-12 weeks. This dramatically accelerates speed of build versus poured concrete and reduces construction risk and waste. In this case the CLT & Glulam system was engineered to meet or exceed F2 tornado as well as the local seismic code.
CLT buildings are far lighter than concrete and therefore the foundation requirements can be dramatically reduced.
Concrete and steel have enormous embodied energy / carbon costs. CLT sequesters carbon offsets carbon footprints.

As for the glue comment - CLT is made from formaldehyde-free, single part, polyurethane, food-grade adhesive. There is no off-gassing and the reduction in formaldehyde laden Gypsum board is healthier for occupants.
As for the waste of money comment, it will ultimately cost less to build this way and will save significant operating capital to run the building.
As for the timber industry needing no help - your state has 18mm acres of trees and nowhere near enough value added processing that creates jobs and leverages a fast growing renewable resource. This wood is coming from Austria because the U.S. is decades behind European innovation in the forestry sector. Part of the intent is to spur more value added wood processing in Arkansas. Everyone wins.
The good people at U of A are pioneers who want to show the university is hub for innovation and sustainability - exactly what universities should be.

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