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Sunday, June 17, 2018, 10:53 p.m.

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Arkansas election season kicks off; 141 candidates file to run

By John Moritz , Jeannie Roberts

This article was published February 23, 2018 at 4:30 a.m.

secretary-of-state-mark-martin-left-places-his-hand-over-his-heart-thursday-in-the-state-capitol-rotunda-as-an-arkansas-national-guard-honor-guard-presents-the-colors-before-martin-officially-declared-the-opening-of-the-candidate-filing-period

Secretary of State Mark Martin (left) places his hand over his heart Thursday in the state Capitol rotunda as an Arkansas National Guard honor guard presents the colors before Martin officially declared the opening of the candidate filing period.

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Photos by Brandon Riddle

Candidates (at right) file paperwork with secretary of state employees Thursday on the second floor rotunda of the state Capitol.

Candidates -- along with their supporters and families -- packed elbow to elbow on the second floor rotunda at the state Capitol on Thursday for the opening of the state and federal campaign filing season.

Click here for larger versions
Photos by Brandon Riddle

Candidates (at right) file paperwork with secretary of state employees Thursday on the second floor rotunda of the state Capitol.

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Print Headline: Election season kicks off; 141 candidates file to run

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Displaying 1 - 6 of 6 total comments

WGT says... February 23, 2018 at 6:31 a.m.

Let’s get going. Any Democrat is better than every republican. The nation can not afford to be regressive. The republicans in power now wish to live in the past. All people only have the future and it cannot be in the hands of ones who have no vision. Vote.
.

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JakeTidmore says... February 23, 2018 at 7:57 a.m.

From Facebook, Marty Alwardt post:

"For those of you saying teachers need to be armed, stop. I'm a teacher, not a body guard, not a police officer, not a soldier. A teacher.

Would I die for your children? I'm sure that I would, but that's just ludicrous to put that on us. Just stop.

Not to mention the fact that we can't fund pensions, text books, insurance, school counselors, professional development, copier ink, paper, our class size is ridiculous, we don't have the help that we need, but now suddenly we can arm and train teachers to double as the last line of defense?

Please knock it off. "

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JakeTidmore says... February 23, 2018 at 7:58 a.m.

From ARTimes Blog on this topic:

In years past, I was a state trained and certified police officer in Arkansas. I can tell you that even for full-time LEO's the chances of an active shooter situation are quite low. Yet most LEO's train for those situations even though until he/she has actually been in that scenario there is no predicting how effectively or safely any individual officer will react. I never had that experience, but I was quite aware of the possibility almost every minute I was on duty.

For civilians the expectation that they should have the same continual awareness while at work is unreasonable and in my opinion that expectation would significantly distract from their primary job responsibilities. And that assumes that those civilians would actually be capable of getting the amount of training needed to equip them to respond safely in such critical response circumstances.

While I was a LEO, I believe I would have responded with as much expertise as my training and ability would have allowed in such a scenario. But I have serious doubts about how effectively or safely that might have proven to be both for my own well-being and the safety of others threatened, especially in a panicked, crowded situation in a confined space like a school.

The most threatening scenario I trained for at the Arkansas Law Enforcement Training Academy was one in which my handgun was grabbed or taken by a suspect in a struggle. I never thought about that possibility until we began to train for it and that is a horrifying and incredibly helpless and paralyzing threat. I am more concerned about an armed teacher having a firearm taken by a student and that would be a much more likely possibility than ever encountering an active shooter at their school location. If a teacher had a firearm taken by an enraged student, there suddenly WOULD be an active shooter where there was none before.

Arming teachers and school personnel is NOT a good suggestion. More guns to protect us from gun violence is NEVER a good idea. Show me statistically where that has ever been true and I might be willing to adjust my opinion. In that case we'd just have to consider the cost/benefit ratio to adding more guns and armed individuals versus making it much more difficult for unstable and violent people accessing firearms--especially handguns and high capacity, high velocity rifles.

Because protecting students and schools isn't the only reason to prevent unstable and violent people from being armed.

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JakeTidmore says... February 23, 2018 at 7:59 a.m.

From Mountaingirl, ARTimes Blog on this subject:

The hubby and I were discussing this over dinner tonight.

Other than the coaches who were forced to teach a class or two, in my entire 12 years of public school, I had ZERO male teachers. Most of my teachers were middle aged to elderly ladies. The hubby (educated in Missouri) had a few male teachers, but not many in high school and none in elementary school. But our principal and superintendent were always male.

I don't have any idea how many more men have decided to become classroom teachers in recent years, but based on the schools I am familiar with, it's not a many.

So, who are we talking about arming? The middle aged and elderly ladies? Or young first-year teachers in their mid-20s, like my niece who might weigh 95 pounds?

And let's pretend a teacher is armed. When there is an active shooter alert, each teacher has very specific duties to maintain the safety of her class. Does she abandon her students, locate her weapon and go look for the shooter? What about her students? Who is responsible for them?

The logistics of this are mind boggling. Plus, every female teacher I've talked to today told me there is no way she would ever carry a weapon into a classroom, nor would she be responsible for one placed elsewhere.

All of these people who want to arm teachers but haven't been in a classroom since they graduated should be asking THE TEACHERS about this instead of pulling an irrational suggestion out of thin air.

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BoudinMan says... February 23, 2018 at 8:17 a.m.

Interesting to see that French Hill was nowhere to be found. He sent a proxy. What's up? The House is not in session. He's on paid vacation. Probably visiting a bank somewhere on a "fact-finding-mission."

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KnuckleBall says... February 23, 2018 at 4:53 p.m.

Hill is a joke and should be ashamed to run again.

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