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Monday, June 18, 2018, 3:07 a.m.

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Predicting future for Olympic stars

By Tim Dahlberg The Associated Press

This article was published February 25, 2018 at 2:33 a.m.

file-in-this-feb-7-2018-file-photo-russian-curler-alexander-krushelnitsky-practices-ahead-of-the-2018-winter-olympics-in-gangneung-south-korea-krushelnitsky-was-stripped-of-his-olympic-bronze-medal-after-admitting-to-a-doping-violation-at-the-pyeongchang-games-krushelnitsky-tested-positive-for-meldonium-which-is-believed-to-help-blood-circulation-after-winning-bronze-in-mixed-doubles-with-his-wife-anastasia-bryzgalova-ap-photoaaron-favila-file

FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2018, file photo, Russian curler Alexander Krushelnitsky practices ahead of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea. Krushelnitsky was stripped of his Olympic bronze medal after admitting to a doping violation at the Pyeongchang Games. Krushelnitsky tested positive for meldonium, which is believed to help blood circulation, after winning bronze in mixed doubles with his wife, Anastasia Bryzgalova. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila, File)

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea -- They've had their moment on prime-time TV, the skiers and skaters who dazzled or flopped in the Winter Olympics. But fame can be fleeting, and a lot of Olympians are quickly forgotten as we concentrate on other sports in the four years between games.

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