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AG's letter says Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission member got offer of a bribe

Firm seeking license to grow received 1 high rating, it says

By Hunter Field

This article was published June 8, 2018 at 4:30 a.m.

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge is shown in this photo.

Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission member Dr. J. Carlos Roman is shown in this file photo.

An Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission member was offered a bribe by one of the unsuccessful applicants for the state's first cannabis growing licenses, the commissioner told authorities.

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge is shown in this photo.

Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission member Dr. J. Carlos Roman is shown in this file photo.

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Print Headline: AG's letter says pot panelist got offer of a bribe

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Comments on: AG's letter says Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission member got offer of a bribe

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Displaying 1 - 5 of 5 total comments

MrsRoman says... June 8, 2018 at 12:24 p.m.

fact correction: this was NOT Dr. Roman's 2nd highest score! The applications went directly to the ABC after the grading process and the ABC determined which applications met the standard requirements. A Pine Bluff farmer received the 2nd highest score.

The spin on this story is appalling. Arkansans deserve more than 1/2 truths & missing facts. Carlos Roman is an honorable man who has given his personal time and expertise to this state for over 18 years in the form of public service, not financial gain! So, as an "average citizen" he does have the experience of public service but yes, he is inexperienced in dealing with "these issues" and he wasn't aware that "these issues" were a part of public service.

I'm the proud wife of Dr. Roman. This is a man who has repeatedly reached out to state and government officials warning them of the opioid epidemic long before the politicians realized they could use opioids to further their political careers while continuing to ignore the problem and this is why he got involved with "medical" marijuana. He was hoping he could spare Arkansans from further becoming like the victims of "big pharma" & "big tobacco" -who killed people and manipulated the medical system to line their pockets. I know he cares about our community and he cares deeply about the individuals who have already paid the ultimate price due to lack of oversight caused by blinding profits. As someone who cares for and treats victims of opioids everyday, he feels a great responsibility to this community and as a commissioner, he wanted to protect the community by choosing cultivators who were a part of this community and also felt a responsibility to this community.

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LRAttorneyCrime says... June 8, 2018 at 12:35 p.m.

Carlos Roman is a known pervader of half truths himself. He he has denigrated several great doctors to patients and others, knowing that what he was saying was incorrect. His scoring was way outside the scoring of others and there is absolutely no way to describe the differences in his scores and the other commissioners, with the exception of Story (which is most likely corruption within itself).

I have represented physicians and before Roman knew anything about the case or the doctor himself, he went to several people and made statements that were completely false. My only question is whether (if he really didn't accept the mentioned bribe) he took one offered by the company (his good friend and associate that he had to know it was his friend's application) that he scored the highest. This story is not full of half-truths, and Carlos should have let the MMC know of the offered bribe when it happened, or at a minimum, informed the court at the time he was accused of the "appearance of bias."

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LRAttorneyCrime says... June 8, 2018 at 12:38 p.m.

Based on my interactions with Roman and people he talked to, Roman thinks anything he believes is accurate and if someone (even another physician) disagrees with him, he will destroy them.

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LRAttorneyCrime says... June 8, 2018 at 12:52 p.m.

Oh, yea, MrsRoman, your husband is one of the problems with the "opioid epidemic" which does not exist. He is just against patients being able to have a life when in severe pain. I have seen the benefits of opioids (hydrocodone to be specific) and for anyone to say that this specific medication is part of the problem is crazy and never had to take them. The so-called opioid epidemic only exists because rich white kids started dying from overdoses. Poor black kids have been dying from overdoses for years and no one gave a crap. However, once it hit your financial friends' community--it is all of a sudden an epidemic. The epidemic is heroin and maybe just maybe Oxycontin. The "epidemic" became a problem after Oxycontin hit the rich community, however, heroin was already killing many black and hispanic teenagers everyday. Your group (including your husband) just did not give a crap because it was not in your community.

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LR1955 says... June 9, 2018 at 9:15 a.m.

In this case:
Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen Is problem #2.
Lawyers are problem #3.
The rules, regulation, & overall write-up of the Medical Pot act is #1.
It’s all about money, not helping people in need.

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