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Monday, June 18, 2018, 3:07 a.m.

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OPINION

PAUL GREENBERG: Who killed Agatha Christie?

And why do we still care?

By Paul Greenberg

This article was published March 7, 2018 at 4:30 a.m.

When it came to bad reviews by good critics of her many crime novels, Agatha Christie may have led all other writers. For she was both a prolific author and her own most memorable character--no matter which fictional identity she was assuming at the mysterious moment.

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JakeTidmore says... March 7, 2018 at 7:35 a.m.

Am not sure why you compare Agatha Christie with a racist matron of dubious character and values.
Sometimes you worship of Southern lunacy is beyond reason.

You were not being thoughtless about the Union nor the wasted lives. It was very honest. But, a nasty threat from her quelled your cowardly hide into submission. You should have threatened to cut her throat in return.

Siding against the Union and caving in to slavery-loving fanatics, no matter how they disguise themselves, is an act that should shame any true American.

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Nljwbailey06081103 says... March 7, 2018 at 8:17 a.m.

I, for one, loved Agatha Christie's books & had purchased most of them at one time.

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JakeTidmore says... March 7, 2018 at 11:09 a.m.

On the whole, am in agreement with bailey about AG's mysteries. She had a knack for characterization, loading up the red herring pond, and that most famous of Christie traits - the final gathering of suspects when the detective reveals the true culprit and the hidden motive behind the crime.
The one in which the narrator turns out to be the killer caught me by surprise, for sure. On the other hand, her suspense books and the Tommy&Tuppence series left me feeling shortchanged when it came to good solid mystery writing.
One of her last books, "Passenger to Frankfurt", is a suspense story that had Hitler surviving WW II. Bizarre premise!
Robert Barnard on the tale: "The last of the thrillers, and one that slides from the unlikely to the inconceivable and finally lands up in incomprehensible muddle. Prizes should be offered to readers who can explain the ending."
**
I fall back upon one of the most cited legal fictions about writing used by critics and readers ever since it first appeared. I'm referring to Sturgeon's law, an adage commonly cited as "ninety percent of everything is crap".
Which, BTW, includes editorials, OPEDs, letters to the editors, movie reviews, and, certainly, blog commentary.

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