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Thursday, May 26, 2016, 1:27 p.m.
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Public profile for JakeTidmore

Comment history

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KARK reporter shares email from viewer who called him a 'disgrace to Arkansas' May 24, 2016 at 7:12 p.m.

Compared to your output, DDDKKKKA, he's done an outstanding job. You, on the other hand, have said little and communicated less. You're minimalist in thought, empathy, and understanding.
So, you've achieved a zen masturbatory pleasure of success without the need for any actual accomplishment. Richardcraniums excel at this sort of verbal ripostes.

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Hutchinson: Mansion shift Legislature's May 24, 2016 at 7:36 a.m.

From ARTimes:
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1) Let's get the balderdash out of the way. Of course it was the governor's idea. Or maybe more precisely First Lady Susan Hutchinson, whose decorating tastes run counter to the period furnishings favored by past commissioners for the public rooms. She also, like some first ladies before her, doesn't much like welcoming public visitors through the public rooms below and above the first family's personal space. Expect them to be moved to a side entrance.

2) The press/public has never been denied admission to scheduled Mansion's Commission meetings. Regrettably, none attended some the last year or so, when First Lady Susan Hutchinson's unhappiness about outside oversight became apparent.

3) The Commission was working on adopting administrative rules, though Heritage Director Stacy Hurst, already an ex officio member of the Commission, scuttled at least one meeting on the rules proposals. (Now that she's a voting member, will her family flower shop be able to sell decorative items to the Mansion?)

4) The article didn't mention the $1.1 million the Hutchinsons got from an agency under Hurst's control for Mansion work including upgrades to private space and some special treatment for a piece of sculpture the first lady particularly admires.

5) There was no mention of a policy shift that has made the Mansion and its great hall — built through a bipartisan fund-raising effort — less available for use by nonprofit groups.

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TV meteorologist's cover-up stirs up dust devil of responses May 23, 2016 at 2:18 p.m.

emax...sounds like you're talking about the Arkansas legislature.

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Letters May 23, 2016 at 9:57 a.m.

All the issues which fired my spirit and comments have become somewhat moot, even muted, by what is now occurring in our home. Nielsen cites the poet telling us that loss is the great lesson. It also is a very hard lesson.
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Such is life.....and death. Later. Give your loved ones a hug or a pet.

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Letters May 23, 2016 at 9:56 a.m.

Our cat of 17 years, Agatha, is not doing well. I won't go into the sad details but we're taking her to the vet this afternoon with only a marginal sense of hope. This piece from Jan Nielsen helped me.

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At some time in our lives, each of us will know loss. We can lose the things we treasure. We can lose the abilities to do the things that give us joy. We can lose the people we love. When we lose and when we hurt, our life paths can bring us to places we might never have chosen on our own. Suffering can change us, and shape us.
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In his essay called “What Suffering Does,” David Brooks wrote in the New York Times about the happiness debate. “When people talk about the past,” he wrote, “they don’t only talk about happiness. It is often the ordeals that seem most significant. People shoot for happiness,” he says, “but feel formed through suffering.” Now, neither he nor I would say that it is good to suffer or that bad things happen to make us stronger. That’s not what I believe; sometimes things happen that never can be justified. But when bad things do happen, and loss comes into our lives, we can be forever changed. “Suffering,” as David Brooks reminds us, “drags you deeper into yourself.”
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This speaks to my experience and perhaps it does to yours too. I have lost my parents, and most recently a brother, among other losses in my life, and each time I have lost, I have learned more about who I am. “The agony (of grief),” Brooks says, “smashes through the bottom floor of (who we think we are),” and takes us deeper, showing us a self we otherwise never may have known. We learn all over again that there are things in life we cannot control. We learn that, no matter how smart or resourceful we imagine ourselves to be, we can’t will away the pain of loss. We can learn, too, after a time, that while we can’t change what has happened, neither are we bound to stand by do nothing.
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Suffering, you see, can teach us; Loss, the poet says, is the great lesson. We can respond to suffering and to loss by digging deep and finding more of ourselves to give, maybe even a part of ourselves we had never fully known. Here’s where we could share stories. People who face hard times look around and say, “What can I do?” People volunteer to serve others who hurt. People fine their music. People dig way down deep and turn their stories into books. Parents who have lost children, and faced what may be the worst sorrow, find ways to honor their child’s life by giving– they plant trees, they build playgrounds, they start foundations.
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We could share stories all day, stories of people who, in the midst of darkness, found light. You all know these stories, for some of them are your stories. When loss leads us to find more of ourselves than we had known, it is then that we can see within our hurting selves a light -- and light, the poet reminds us, is an invitation to happiness.

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A mouthpiece for public education May 22, 2016 at 4:52 p.m.

Grim....what you intended to say was fair and square. I do recognize that. And both you & I know what an a$$hole I can be about facts, research, etc. (An ornery one, at that!!) Reminding me of that is a good thing.
But, the much harder thing is getting the facts marshaled to prove your point. Without them or lacking enough of them, you're in an a$$-kicking contest with no leg to stand on, much less kick with.
Got a book club meeting shortly, then Sunday night PBS mystery, then bedtime. Hectic week coming up and, sadly, it looks like our oldest cat is quite ill and near the end. Vet will let us know more tomorrow.
Thanks Grim. Gotta leave you and the others for a while.

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A mouthpiece for public education May 22, 2016 at 4:18 p.m.

I'll be honest....more than I can say for Slak....my last post were my opinions. And, let's be honest, grump: I'm not some moron claiming that his word is gospel & the truth. The Richard Craniums of the world (in my oh-pin-yun) are not great sources for "truth."
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So, grump, since you're so astute, help Slak out and give him that proof and evidence he so desperately needs to convince us he's got some real live facts...something which would have been more obvious IF he actually had done some homework and study....not just scratched his head, looked up in amazement, and said, "Gawl-lee, lookee here Andy. I done dug some truth outta the top of my haid."

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A mouthpiece for public education May 22, 2016 at 2:17 p.m.

How egotistical for a non-expert (pseudo??) to cite himself as the source of the "truth". Especially when they reach their so-called truth without giving evidence or proof to back it up. Which is why you must take opinions ("...a view or judgment formed about something, not necessarily based on fact or knowledge) with a rather large grain of salt.
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Nothing angers a pseudo-expert faster than asking for valid proof and reliable evidence.

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A mouthpiece for public education May 22, 2016 at 1:34 p.m.

Actually, you're just repeating it because you love the sound of your own voice. I doubt you have the studies and research to back up your statements.
Seems like you prefer playing cards with jokers in the deck. That and trying to bluff folks.

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A mouthpiece for public education May 22, 2016 at 7:14 a.m.

“Now I will tell you the answer to my question. It is this. The Party seeks power entirely for its own sake. We are not interested in the good of others; we are interested solely in power, pure power. What pure power means you will understand presently. We are different from the oligarchies of the past in that we know what we are doing. All the others, even those who resembled ourselves, were cowards and hypocrites.
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The German Nazis and the Russian Communists came very close to us in their methods, but they never had the courage to recognize their own motives. They pretended, perhaps they even believed, that they had seized power unwillingly and for a limited time, and that just around the corner there lay a paradise where human beings would be free and equal. We are not like that.
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We know that no one ever seizes power with the intention of relinquishing it. Power is not a means; it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship. The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power. Now you begin to understand me.”
― George Orwell, 1984
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Kudos Mr Jackson. You have taken the ADG editors to the wood shed and administered a well-deserved whipping to the rascals.

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