Today's Paper Latest stories Paper Trails Obits Weather Newsletters Puzzles/games
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
story.lead_photo.caption Temawashigumo Shibori exemplifies both the 3-D possibilities of shibori and the bridge between traditional and new. Once bound, sewn or otherwise manipulated, the fabric takes on a sculptural, three-dimensional form. Here, shibori lampshades are part of the Suzusan Luminaires collection Shizuku. - Photo by AP / SUZUSAN, HIROYUKI MURASE

From tablecloths to duvet covers, iPhone cases to wallpaper and startling calfskin wall hangings, the ancient Japanese resist-dyeing technique of shibori has gone mainstream. Vera Wang, Ralph Lauren, Eileen Fisher, Levi’s and innumerable fiber artists are breathing new life into the craft.

This story is only available from the Arkansas Online archives. Stories can be purchased individually for $2.95. Click here to search for this story in the archives.

HomeStyle, Pages 38 on 02/08/2014

Print Headline: Ancient Japanese dyeing art catches on in West

Sponsor Content

Comments

You must be signed in to post comments
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT