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story.lead_photo.caption In this July 23, 2012, file photo, James Holmes, who is charged with killing 12 moviegoers and wounding 70 more in a shooting rampage in a crowded theater in Aurora, Colo., in July 2012, sits in Arapahoe County District Court in Centennial, Colo.

CENTENNIAL, Colo. — Jurors convicted Colorado theater shooter James Holmes on Thursday in the chilling 2012 attack on defenseless moviegoers at a midnight Batman premiere, rejecting defense arguments that the former graduate student was insane and driven to murder by delusions.

The 27-year-old Holmes, who had been working toward his Ph.D. in neuroscience, could get the death penalty for the massacre that left 12 people dead and dozens of others wounded.

Jurors took about 13 hours over a day and a half to review all 165 charges. The same panel must now decide whether Holmes should pay with his life.

The verdict came almost three years after Holmes, dressed head-to-toe in body armor, slipped through the emergency exit of the darkened theater in suburban Denver and replaced the Hollywood violence of the movie The Dark Knight Rises with real human carnage.

His victims included two active-duty servicemen, a single mom, a man celebrating his 27th birthday and an aspiring broadcaster who had survived a mall shooting in Toronto. Several died shielding friends or loved ones.

Read Friday's Arkansas Democrat-Gazette for full details.

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  • MaxCady
    July 16, 2015 at 5:42 p.m.

    Well, plan on keeping him on ice for the next 50-60 years. Colorado last executed someone in 1997 and is considered a "de facto" non-capital punishment state.

  • mitchstoner
    July 16, 2015 at 7:20 p.m.

    He needs to be either dead or never see daylight again.

  • mitchstoner
    July 16, 2015 at 7:35 p.m.

    Two things about this sort of crime bother me almost as much as the loss of life and people's lives being messed up:

    One, the fact that no matter how horrible or even sickening a crime might be, somewhere among us are twisted individuals who think, "Cool! I wish I could do something like that!"

    Second, how is it possible for anyone to raise a child in such a way he grows up with absolutely no respect for the value of others' lives.

    Wish there was a sure fire method of spotting these people by the age of two or thereabouts so someone caring could intervene and alter the course these guys are on.

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