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story.lead_photo.caption FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2008 file photo, adult film star Stormy Daniels arrives at the 50th Annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. CBS News President David Rhodes says that a "60 Minutes" interview with Daniels needs more journalistic work. Rhodes' statement at a conference in Israel Tuesday was the first time CBS publicly confirmed it had interviewed Daniels, who has alleged an extramarital affair with Donald Trump before he became president. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)

• David Rhodes, the president of CBS News, said Tuesday that a 60 Minutes interview with adult film star Stormy Daniels is on its way but that more journalistic work needs to be done on the story before it is aired. Rhodes' statement at a conference in Israel was the first time CBS publicly confirmed it had interviewed the actress, who has alleged an extramarital affair with Donald Trump before he became president. Trump has denied this. Michael Avenatti, lawyer for the actress, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, last week tweeted a picture of himself, Clifford and CBS interviewer Anderson Cooper. While BuzzFeed has reported that Trump's lawyers were considering seeking an injunction to block the interview from being aired, Rhodes, in remarks reported by Variety, said he could not imagine what the basis would be for any legal action by Trump's team to prevent it from being shown. The exchange between Cooper and Clifford was "accompanied also by conversations with attorneys, documents were provided, and so we have to run all that down before it runs," he said. The actress is seeking to invalidate a nondisclosure agreement under which she was paid $130,000 not to give details of her encounters with Trump. Clifford said Monday that she has offered to repay the money as long as she can speak openly about the situation. But Trump's legal team did not respond by a Tuesday deadline set by Avenatti to settle Clifford's lawsuit seeking to void the confidentiality agreement.

• A grandson of cult leader Charles Manson has won a California court battle over the killer's body. Kern County Superior Court Commissioner Alisa Knight ruled Monday that Jason Freeman can retrieve Manson's remains, which have been on ice in the Bakersfield morgue since his death in November. Freeman didn't immediately comment but previously said he would cremate and spread the ashes of Manson and put to rest "this so-called monster, this historical figure that shouldn't have been blown up as big as it was for all these years." Manson died in a hospital in Bakersfield while serving a life sentence for orchestrating the 1969 killings of pregnant actress Sharon Tate and eight others. He was 83. The fight over his corpse devolved into several friends filing competing wills purportedly signed by the infamous inmate while people claiming to be kin began surfacing to stake claims to the killer's body and an estate that could include lucrative rights to songs Manson wrote or to license his image and other material. Attorney Dale Kiken, who represents Freeman, said his client is respectful and won't keep ashes or pieces of Manson. Kiken expects there to be a public ceremony, possibly documented by a film crew, in which Manson's ashes are scattered on a body of water.

Photo by California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation via AP, File
This Aug. 14, 2017, file photo provided by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shows Charles Manson.

A Section on 03/14/2018

Print Headline: Names and faces

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