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11:20 A.M. THURSDAY: UPDATE

LITTLE ROCK — A company that had been slated to be among the first to grow medical marijuana in Arkansas is asking a judge who halted the licensing process to allow the firm's permit to go forward.

Delta Medical Cannabis Company LLC asked Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen on Wednesday to lift part of his order so the company can receive its license as a cultivation facility. Griffen last week ruled that the licensing process violated the 2016 voter-approved constitutional amendment legalizing medical marijuana.

Delta was one of five companies that the state had planned to license before Griffen issued a restraining order.

Delta said its license was issued fairly and that the problems raised by an unsuccessful applicant that had filed a lawsuit don't apply to its facility.

WEDNESDAY STORY:

LITTLE ROCK — One of five companies that had been slated to receive Arkansas' first licenses to grow medical marijuana has asked a state judge to lift his order halting the permitting process and declaring it unconstitutional.

Natural State Wellness Enterprises LLC asked Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen on Wednesday to vacate his order preventing Arkansas from issuing its first medical marijuana cultivation licenses. Griffen last week ruled that the licensing process violated a 2016 voter-approved constitutional amendment legalizing marijuana for patients with certain conditions.

Griffen ruled in favor of an unsuccessful applicant that had sued over the licensing process. The state is appealing Griffen's ruling.

[DOCUMENTS: Read complaints filed + winning applications from top five growers]

Natural State says in Wednesday's filing that the case should be transferred to Lee County, where another lawsuit over the licensing process had been filed.

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