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"Justice has never been served in this case." That is how Courtney Wild, one of the many women who says she was sexually abused as a child by Jeffrey Epstein, bitterly--and aptly--characterized government failure to hold the wealthy financier to account for his alleged crimes. Her words should be more than an epitaph; instead, they should serve as a powerful prod to federal prosecutors to leave no stone unturned in determining if there were others culpable in Epstein's crimes.

A Manhattan courtroom on Tuesday became a forum for Epstein's alleged victims to vent their anger and frustration as formal charges against him were dismissed after the financier died by suicide while awaiting trial in federal custody. "Jeffrey Epstein robbed myself and all the other victims of our day in court to confront him one by one, and for that he is a coward," said Wild, the first of more than a dozen women who spoke.

Prosecutors told the court their investigation continues and that charges against potential co-conspirators and the civil forfeiture of Epstein's assets are still possible. That is reassuring, because if you listen to the women who were victimized, they will tell you that Epstein got help in procuring teenage girls and women for sex with him and others.

Editorial on 08/31/2019

Print Headline: Leave no stone unturned

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