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Fifty-five members of Arkansas' high school graduating Class of 2019 are among 3,500 new graduates to be named winners of National Merit Scholarships financed by U.S. colleges and universities.

The awards provide between $500 and $2,000 annually for up to four years of undergraduate study at the institution financing the scholarship.

The Arkansas students, listed alphabetically by hometowns, high schools, the scholarship-granting institution and their likely career plans, are:

Alma

Andrew L. Astre, Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences and the Arts in Hot Springs; Vanderbilt University, chemical engineering.

Batesville

Kendele J. Kramer, Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences and the Arts in Hot Springs; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, biomedical engineering.

Bella Vista

Trevor R. Fogleman, Bentonville High; Oklahoma State University, economics.

Bentonville

Lilian Shea Agnacian, Bentonville High; University of Chicago, engineering.

Solomon A. Berry, Bentonville High; Brigham Young University, accounting.

Malia S. Camacho, Bentonville High; University of Texas at Dallas, biomedical engineering.

Nayan R. Paul, Bentonville West High at Centerton; University of Texas at Dallas, computer science.

Grant A. Reader, Northwest Arkansas Classical Academy charter school; University of Texas at Dallas, mechanical engineering.

Katrianna E. Sarkar, home school; University of South Florida, mechanical engineering.

Maddox A. Townsend, Bentonville High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, architecture.

Fayetteville

Seylor N. Cluck, Haas Hall Academy; University of Texas at Dallas, medicine.

Josephine F. Crouch, Fayetteville High; University of Missouri, journalism.

James F. Hall, Fayetteville High; University of Alabama, chemistry.

Carson R. Haller, Fayetteville High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, environmental science.

Jackson P. Heck, Fayetteville High; Southern Methodist University, computer science.

Austin Q. Liu, Fayetteville High; Northwestern University, economics.

Josephine M. Matalone, Haas Hall Academy; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, mechanical engineering.

Foster T. Matlock, Fayetteville High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, ecology.

Mollie R. Nichols, Haas Hall Academy; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, computer engineering.

Kyrie A. Potter, Fayetteville High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, engineering.

Katherine N. Upchurch, Haas Hall Academy; University of Alabama, chemical engineering.

Brendan Wolf, Fayetteville High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, theater.

Grayson W. Young, Fayetteville High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, biomedical engineering.

Fort Smith

Ryan S. Beallis, Southside High; University of Texas at Dallas, medicine.

Julia K. Brixey, Greenwood High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, neuroscience.

Vinh H. Nguyen Southside High; Hendrix College, medicine.

Madelene C. Riche, Southside High; Texas Christian University, speech/language pathology.

Greenwood

Tyler L. Merreighn, Greenwood High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, medicine.

Hot Springs

Jordan C. Erickson, Lake Hamilton High at Pearcy; Baylor University, medicine.

Noah J. McClanahan, Lakeside High; University of Mississippi, academia.

Little Rock

Laurel C. Black, Pulaski Academy; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, engineering.

Keira G. Boop, Central High; Hendrix College, foreign service.

Austin T. Crook, Baptist Preparatory School; Ouachita Baptist University, computer science.

Matthew T. Di Leo, Little Rock Christian Academy; Baylor University, medicine.

Elizabeth G. Durand, LISA Academy; Hendrix College, English literature.

Sullivan W. Fitz, Catholic High for Boys; University of Chicago, epidemiology.

Elizabeth Ford, Pulaski Academy; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, biochemistry.

Alexander Han, Central High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, biomedical engineering.

Luke G. Hankins, Little Rock Christian Academy; Baylor University, finance.

Ross M. Kimbrell, Central High; University of Kentucky, psychiatry.

Hannah M. Robertson, eStem High Charter School; Hendrix College, biology.

Eric A. Williams, Central High; University of Kentucky, mechanical engineering.

Lowell

Eli C. Jackson, Providence Classical Christian Academy, Rogers; Liberty University, ministry.

Nathan P. Skinner, Rogers High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, medicine.

Maumelle

Luke H. McClanahan, Central Arkansas Christian School; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, radio/television.

Justin B. Patty, Little Rock Christian Academy; Southern Methodist University, medical research.

McRae

Thomas J. Raymond, Beebe High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, computer science.

Ozark

Isabella Grace Faulkenberry, Ozark High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, psychiatry.

Rogers

Alisha A. Chatlani, Rogers High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, biomedical engineering.

Noah B. Hamby, Arkansas Arts Academy in Rogers; University of Texas at Dallas, biotechnology.

Searcy

Jackson T. Benight, Searcy High; Harding University, marketing.

Colby L. Free, Pangburn High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, engineering.

Sherwood

Andrew Ponder, Sylvan Hills High; University of Central Florida, mathematics.

Jacob E. Ponder, Sylvan Hills High; University of Central Florida, biomedicine.

Springdale

Jackson T. Black, Har-Ber High; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, chemical engineering.

Metro on 06/09/2019

Print Headline: State's National Merit Scholars named

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Archived Comments

  • Shearload
    June 9, 2019 at 10:18 a.m.

    Hmmm. Charter schools not doing so great, even with their bogus "open enrollment" admission scheme that somehow, in Northwest Arkansas, results in lily-white student bodies, family incomes in the top 0.4%, no special needs students, no provided transportation. Sad.

  • Skeptic1
    June 9, 2019 at 10:37 a.m.

    Notice how most of these students were in either private or charter schools, home-schooled, or from the few schools of excellence in the state. Little Rock is the most stunning example, only one public school had these students, Central High, that has national historical prominence that brings in considerable money other schools do not get. Congratulations to these students that were fortunate enough to not be confined to a failing public school.

  • Shearload
    June 9, 2019 at 11:16 a.m.

    First, did you not notice that the vast majority of these "fortunate" students attended public schools? Count them again. Second, luck has little to do with this achievement. Student outcomes are often set in elementary school. And at home.

  • Shearload
    June 9, 2019 at 12:05 p.m.

    Thirty-five of the 55 went to public schools. Thirty-seven if we count Arts and Sciences in Hot Springs. Eight went to charter schools. One was home-schooled. Nine graduated from private/religious schools.

  • Shearload
    June 9, 2019 at 12:49 p.m.

    Two of the sixteen Pulaski County students graduated from charter schools. Not too good. Sylvan Hills alone had two; it has a much smaller enrollment than the combined charter schools in Pulaski County.

  • Shearload
    June 9, 2019 at 1:51 p.m.

    Skeptic1, you disappeared. All hat and no cattle?

  • UoABarefootPhdFICYMCA
    June 9, 2019 at 3:01 p.m.

    500$ lol
    lol
    ..lol

  • UoABarefootPhdFICYMCA
    June 9, 2019 at 3:03 p.m.

    500$ lmao
    5000$ would not even be a generous amount for whhat the state takes.

    500$ lmfao
    what is this?
    1920?
    lmfao.... 500$
    im laughing to not cry.
    lol fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

  • UoABarefootPhdFICYMCA
    June 9, 2019 at 3:05 p.m.

    ya call 500$ a fortune?
    thats some "niggardly" shh
    lol
    Arkansas revenues rival next to california and florida
    a soy plant gets more financial support
    from the government
    than a arkansan child who needs to goto college.

  • UoABarefootPhdFICYMCA
    June 9, 2019 at 3:07 p.m.

    and they all need to goto college!
    because the persistent treatment of some like second class citizens STARTS in k-12 (the dumbing down years, where you learn the rules but not the game.
    #Jeffersonian

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