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• Since Shania Twain launched her first residency in Las Vegas seven years ago, Sin City has been invaded with contemporary pop stars, from Lady Gaga to Drake to Christina Aguilera, jumping on the residency trend. Even Cardi B has plans for a short-term Vegas residency this year. "I know! What are these people [doing] jumping on my bandwagon?" a smiling Twain said as she announced her return to Vegas for a new residency, starting Dec. 6. "Everybody knows that Vegas is awesome and it's only getting better," she said. The 53-year-old Twain, of course, follows in the footsteps of other Las Vegas stalwarts over the decades, from the Rat Pack and Wayne Newton to Cher and Celine Dion. On Monday, Twain announced 23 performances for her "Let's Go!" residency at Zappos Theater at Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino. Twain wrapped her first two-year stint in 2014. Twain said there's a plus side to performing in the same venue every night compared with a road tour. In addition to having a stable environment for her voice, Twain said performers can "really take advantage of the highest standard technology that is usually too sensitive to take on the road and travel," she said.

• A new graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., who became a gun-rights activist in the wake of the deadly shooting that killed 17 people in 2018, said Monday that Harvard College has rescinded its admission offer over racist and offensive remarks he made as a 16-year-old. Kyle Kashuv, 18, announced Harvard's decision on Twitter, posting letters he received from the college -- first asking him to explain the comments, and then informing him that it would no longer accept him, citing its serious consideration of "the qualities of maturity and moral character." Unlike some of his classmates who became national figures for starting a youth movement against gun violence, Kashuv garnered attention as a conservative student in favor of gun rights and improved school security. On Monday, Kashuv wrote on social media that nearly two years ago, when he was 16, he and some classmates used "abhorrent racial slurs" in an effort to be shocking and extremist. He wrote a public apology. While Harvard informs students upon admission that the college reserves the right to withdraw its offer, Rachael Dane, a Harvard spokesman, said the school does not comment publicly on the admission status of individual applicants.

Photo by Invision
Shania Twain
Photo by NYTNS
Kyle Kashuv

A Section on 06/18/2019

Print Headline: Names and faces

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