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Country singer Marty Stuart headlines the 72nd annual Ozark Folk Festival with a concert at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Eureka Springs Auditorium, 36 S. Main St., Eureka Springs. Tickets are $24, $45 and $55. Visit theaud.org. Stuart's recent concerts are marking the 20th anniversary of his album The Pilgrim.

The festival kicks off with a locals' folk fair, 6 p.m. Wednesday at The Auditorium, featuring dance troupes, the Ozark Folk Festival Queens contest and the singer/songwriter contest finals.

Tickets for the traditional Barefoot Ball, 9 p.m. Thursday in the Barefoot Ballroom at the Basin Park Hotel, 12 Spring St. are $5, $10 at the door ($5 if you ditch your shoes and go barefoot). The ball will also feature the announcement of the winners of the Queens and singer/songwriter contests.

Willie Carlisle starts off an afternoon of free music in Basin Spring Park at noon Friday, followed by Reverend Hylton at 3 p.m and Tyler Gregory at 5:30. Saturday music in the park starts at 11 a.m. with Love Holler, with "a surprise guest" at 2 p.m. and Whispering Willows at 5 p.m. The park will also be the site of a handcrafted folk fair with workshops and demonstrations, noon-6 p.m. Friday-Nov. 10.

The Ozark Mountain Daredevils perform at 8 p.m. Friday at The Auditorium. Tickets are $23, $35 and $40.

Me & Him performs the Basin Park band shell at 12:30 p.m. Sunday until the 2 p.m. start of the festival parade.

Additional folk music will be at venues all around town. Ticket information is available at theaud.org; a full schedule is available at ozarkfolkfestival.com.

Violinist Jennifer Frautschi solos Saturday with the Symphony of Northwest Arkansas in Fayetteville. Special to the Democrat-Gazette
Violinist Jennifer Frautschi solos Saturday with the Symphony of Northwest Arkansas in Fayetteville. Special to the Democrat-Gazette

Beethoven concerto

Violinist Jennifer Frautschi solos in Ludwig van Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D major, op.61, with the Symphony of Northwest Arkansas and conductor Paul Haas, 7:30 p.m. Saturday in Baum Walker Hall at Fayetteville's Walton Arts Center, 495 W. Dickson St. The concert opens with Blow It Up, Start Again by American composer Jonathan Newman and concludes with the Symphonic Dances by Sergei Rachmaninoff.

Haas and Frautschi will take part in a 6:30 pre-concert Creative Conversation in the hall. Concert sponsor is Highlands Oncology; Palmer Violins is sponsoring Frautschi's appearance. Tickets are $33, $44 and $55; a few free tickets are available to patrons under 18 with the purchase of an adult ticket. Call (479) 443-5600 or visit sonamusic.org.

Wright writers

Poet and essayist Camille Dungy and novelist Jami Attenberg "headline" the third annual C.D. Wright Women Writers Conference, Friday-Saturday at the University of Central Arkansas, 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway.

The conference focuses on women-identifying writers from all genres and all experience levels, with a goal of providing a space for camaraderie, connection-making and inspiration, according to a news release. It's named for award-winning poet C.D. Wright (1949-2016), a Mountain Home native who published more than a dozen books.

Dungy, a 2019 Guggenheim Fellowship recipient, will give a 6 p.m. Friday reading in the McCastlain Hall Ballroom. Attenberg, whose novel All This Could Be Yours was released Oct. 22, will give a lunchtime reading at 12:15 p.m. Saturday in the same venue.

Saturday's lineup also includes a book fair from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. in the McCastlain Hall lobby, plus craft talks and breakout sessions featuring information on writing, publishing and editing, and practical advice from experienced female writers on how to balance writing, work and home life and readings from creative works.

Registration (including access to events, on-site catering and parking passes) is $100 conference-only, $135 for the conference and a Friday pre-conference workshop or the conference plus an editorial consultation. Admission to just the Saturday lunchtime event only, including Attenberg's talk and a buffet lunch, is $25. Visit cdwrightconference.org/conference.

Viola-piano duo

The Ezra Duo — Jacob Clewell, viola, and Sasha Bult-Ito, piano — will give a recital at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Steinway Piano Gallery Little Rock, 657 Arkansas 365, Mayflower. The program: Suite from Romeo and Juliet by Sergei Prokofiev, Sonata for Viola and Piano by Rebecca Clarke, A Boy and a Makeshift Toy by Mary Kouyoumdjian and Johannes Brahms' version for piano and viola of his Cello Sonata No. 1 in e minor, op.38. Tickets, available at EzraDuoLittleRock.Eventbrite.com, are free; they'll accept a suggested $30 donation to help cover artist and venue fees at the door. A reception will follow. Call (405) 250-1612.

1989 remembered

Harding University faculty members Allen Diles, Cliff Ganus III, Russ Keck and Liann Gallagher will highlight events and topics from 1989, including evangelism beyond the Iron Curtain, Soviet music and propaganda, the Watchmen novel, the Cold War and Tienanmen Square and the failure of the Chinese revolution, for the university's fall Liberal Arts Colloquium Series, 6:30 p.m. Monday, in Cone Chapel at Harding, 915 E. Market Ave., Searcy. Admission is free. Call (501) 279-4108 or visit harding.edu/community.

Textile paintings by Cory D. Perry, including The Liberation of Otto Pradamalia, go on display this week at the Fenix Gallery in Fayetteville. Special to the Democrat-Gazette

'Consuming Culture'

"Consuming Culture," an exhibition centering on textile paintings by Cory D. Perry with guest artists, opens Wednesday at The Fenix Gallery, 16 W. Center St., Fayetteville, with a 5-8 p.m. First Thursday reception. The exhibition "[investigates] the intersection between class and capitalism, white supremacy and black affirmation, as well as gender identity and religion," according to a news release.

It remains up through Nov. 30. Support comes from the Windgate Fellowship Award administered by the Center for Craft. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Admission to the reception and the gallery is free. Visit the Facebook page, facebook.com/fenixfayettevilleart.

Bard auditions

The Arkansas Shakespeare Theatre will hold non-Equity auditions, 1-7 p.m. Dec. 15 at Reynolds Performance Hall, University of Central Arkansas, 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. Actors should prepare one Shakespeare monologue and 32 bars of a musical theater piece and provide sheet music in the appropriate key for the accompanist (please aim for a total audition time of no more than three minutes.) The early summer 2020 festival — dates to be announced — will include, in repertory, William Shakespeare's comedy As You Like It, the Reduced Shakespeare Company's The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged) and the musical Into the Woods. Make an audition appointment by emailing your headshot and resume to casting@arkshakes.com.

Joplin: stage to screen

A Night With Janis Joplin, a multi-camera capture of the Broadway musical, is appearing on big screens across the country this week, including at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Little Rock's Movie Tavern Cinema, 11300 Bass Pro Parkway. Tickets and more information are available at cinelifeentertainment.com/event/a-night-with-janis-joplin.

Book of Mormon in Memphis

The misadventures of a mismatched pair of Mormon missionaries make for mayhem and mirth in The Book of Mormon (music, lyrics and book by Trey Parker, Robert Lopez and Matt Stone), 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, 1 p.m. Nov. 10 at the Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main St., Memphis. Tickets are $29-$150. Call (901) 525-3000 or visit orpheum-memphis.com.

Style on 11/03/2019

Print Headline: Marty Stuart brings hillbilly rock to Eureka Springs

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