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Looks like negligence

The Arkansas Supreme Court recently rendered a decision of "no negligence" on the part of a driver who was on the wrong side of the highway resulting in a head-on crash in which four people in the other vehicle died. This decision defies common sense to me.

According to the article in the Democrat-Gazette, the male driver of the vehicle that caused this accident crossed the centerline due to his reaching down to pick an article off the floor of his vehicle, resulting in the vehicle going into the oncoming lane of the highway. How any rational person could say this would not be negligence is beyond me. The duty of a vehicle operator at all times is to make sure their vehicle stays on its side of the highway so that oncoming traffic is not endangered. Unfortunately, in the case decided, four innocent people lost their lives.

When a driver's actions cause a vehicle to leave its lane of travel and go into the opposite lane (oncoming traffic lane), how can any sane person say that does not constitute negligence? That driver would have to take his eyes off the road as well as his mind on something other than his driving. People, that is negligence; that's all there is to it. If four justices of the court can't see that, we need four new justices on the court!

GUY RANSOM

Jonesboro

New fees not unfair

After reading so many letters to the editor (mostly negative) concerning newly hiked $100 fees for registering hybrid and electric vehicles that share the roads of this state, I wonder if any of these folks understand just what is the origin of state registration fees versus state fuel taxes. Not to get them confused, but these charges together help pay for everything that involves private and commercial vehicle use, abuse, detriment, maintenance, paperwork, and roadwork upon our state highways. Speed-limit and construction- zone signs? I don’t know.

Surely you can understand that when fuel taxes were originally imposed, there were very very few electric or hybrid road vehicles. Most used gasoline. Still with me? Road-use taxes were based on the weight and the distance that weight was powered along any state road by a formula including the class of vehicle (that is, its weight) and fuel consumption (as a measure of distance). If you drive an 18-wheeler, you definitely know this. So unless your hybrid or electric (or even nuclear rocket) vehicle is weightless (as an airplane after it leaves the runway), then your vehicle is liable for charges for upkeep of the common road.

Most hopefully, as green vehicles continue to replace fossil-fueled ones, we may all enjoy paying $100 (or whatever amount it requires) in the near future that we have left before we all air-fry like popcorn. Until that (un)time, with gratitude, you do save money on fuel and help the environment as you pass me at 65 mph in a Prius along the I-630 construction zone. Did I say zoom on down the road?

PHILLIP CORRELL

Little Rock

Seem unconcerned

The abuse of animals is now a federal crime, a felony. Now, I am certainly against animal abuse, but what about our laws regarding human life? It is not only legal to kill a human in utero, and in some instances, allow a baby to die after birth, it seems it is accepted as a right for no other reason than the human is an inconvenience.

How have we allowed this nation to become pagans that sacrifice their own children? May God have mercy on our souls.

ROBERT RHOADS

North Little Rock

Was that a solo trip?

Dana D. Kelley in last Friday’s paper describes his excursion through Searcy County, prompted by a comment by his mother-in-law. Where is his wife in all of this?

CHARLES H. BROWN

Fairfield Bay

What’s not important

I guess we all have our favorites—and the reverse—from watching two weeks of testimony in the impeachment inquiry. I was greatly impressed by Marie Yovanovich and Fiona Hill, two extremely competent, fair, and forthright women I would have been happy to call boss back in my working days. Among the Republican members, I liked Texas Rep. Will Hurd, who was always civil and respectful to the people he was questioning. In contrast, Representatives Devin Nunes and Jim Jordan were often rude or bullying.

Russ Bailey obviously doesn’t like Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman. Mr. Bailey implies that he has as much right as Vindman to testify about the July 25 phone call, which is to say none at all. However, Colonel Vindman had been given the responsibility to listen to the call. His duties were complex. Bailey resents that Vindman wore his dress uniform to the hearing. Army officers are expected to be in uniform when attending official functions, and what could be more official, in fact historical, than an impeachment hearing?

I believe that military people take an oath to obey all lawful orders. That does leave them an individual conscience. Colonel Vindman heard what sounded like an abuse of power in that call. He took his concerns through what he considered the chain of command to White House lawyer John Eisenberg, who apparently buried them.

No one is above the law. The issue is abuse of power. The issue is the evidence. The issue is how constitutional scholars define “high crimes and misdemeanors.” In the end, who we like or don’t like is not that important.

CORALIE KOONCE

Fayetteville

Treat pupils equally

I read there has been a lawsuit filed concerning the number of black children disciplined in the Pulaski County Special School District and Little Rock School District versus the number of white children. So are those filing suit suggesting black children should not be disciplined?

Discipline should be the same for all children; that is a no-brainer. I believe the fact that more black children are disciplined than white children is not racial or unfair; it simply means more black children misbehave. Should the schools curtail discipline for black children until the number of white children needing discipline has caught up to the number of black children?

Common sense has been thrown to the wind. Discipline should be the same for all. The schools can’t perceive the numbers of what race will misbehave, but equal treatment for all is the key.

MIKE HUGHES

Sherwood

Editorial on 11/29/2019

Print Headline: Letters

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