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Punishment methods

Instead of trying the never-ending battle to change the Second Amendment to try and stop the gun violence, maybe we should use the old established methods of punishment for gun and other means of violence.

A book I read in college in the 1960s gives us the message that if punishment is bad enough, crime will go down. Horse thieves were hung. Many other crimes got 10-20 years of hard labor in prison, and no such thing as an appeal. In many cases if they were sentenced to death, they were taken away and punishment happened ASAP.

I believe our courts may be the real problem with why we cannot seem to make progress on the gun violence problem; could we be looking in the wrong location? I recommend we change our laws and start really punishing the guilty as harshly as possible to try and deter gun violence.

This will sound awful to many, but going back to real methods of punishment might just be the answer we are looking for.

TOMMY THOMPSON

Morrilton

For the benefit of all

To add to a letter by Gene Mason about socialism in this country: Any line of work paid from our tax dollars is socialism. Federal, state, municipal workers, police, firefighters, teachers, public schools, and all our military, as well as every government program and department--and that makes our country great. We pay for all this because it benefits all of us (social), and that includes every representative of government.

Some try to align socialism with failed fascist dictators or communism in countries that do not provide for the general welfare of the populace as our Constitution mandates for us. Article 1, Section 8 grants Congress the power to lay and collect taxes, duties, etc., "to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States."

"General welfare" refers to the overall success of the people of our great country.

EDITH SEAMAN

Lakeview

Whither our station?

It is another somewhat untypical evening in northeast Arkansas. Not a cloud in the sky between here and Little Rock and yet AETN is off the air again, as it is almost constantly with a cloud, and now without one. Of course in Jonesboro we have a regional transmitter, and it is a complete disaster that both the satellite services use it. Hence, AETN is, to us, dead. We have complained without effect, and so it's time to say goodbye. We have donated for as many years as I can remember, but no more.

Is this a great loss? Not really, in a state where only Fox counts. Hence, going off the air up here will affect only the talented tenth, and they have other options.

MICHAEL B. DOUGAN

Jonesboro

Is it worth the cost?

Why go to the expense of changing speed-limit signs? People already are traveling in excess of 75, even on I-430 where the speed limit is posted at 65 mph.

Has anyone considered the cost? Using money for road repair would be of better use.

DWIGHT ANDERSON

Little Rock

More Karens needed

Have you met "Karen"? She is an uppity, self-righteous, empowered mom who has "had it up to here" and would now like to see the manager. She's bulldoggish because she knows, deep in her fed-up (possibly over-privileged) bones, that this is wrong and she is not having it anymore. A true Karen is just done with ineptitude, her irritation sated only by manager's correction.

In the case of the state takeover of the Little Rock School District, we need more Karens: people who see that the state Board of Education has harmed the district--multiplied 22 failing schools out of six, closed schools, opened competing charters, communicated poorly, and held children to standards that the state does not teach.

Karen recognizes that something is off; pick one: (1) taxation without representation, (2) failure to improve schools where, even if her baby doesn't attend, "they" deserve a decent education, (3) the unfairness of unreasonable standards for her teacher friends, (4) that cloying sense of a racialized situation she can't put her finger on, (5) if the state can do this to Little Rock, imagine when it'll find cause to take over others.

Karen values fairness, equality, and moral high ground. Karen wants to speak to corporate, beyond middle management/appointed board Johnny Key hiding in the back office, to boss Gov. Asa Hutchinson. Karen wanted to attend the last community meeting on Sept. 3, but she got tickets to Ruth Bader Ginsburg--so to soothe her guilt, Karen needs to call manager Hutchinson and give him a piece of her mind; insist on returning control to a locally elected board representative of the children. Because Karen, if she has any real purpose in life, it's to use her powers for good. Call Hutchinson now. It is literally the least she can do.

MARIE MAINARD-O'CONNELL

Little Rock

Editorial on 09/04/2019

Print Headline: Letters

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