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story.lead_photo.caption Near the Israeli settlement of Bet El, north of Ramallah, a demonstrator throws back a tear gas canister Wednesday fired by Israeli forces during clashes as Palestinians protest Israel’s plan to annex parts of the West Bank. (AP/Majdi Mohammed)

JERUSALEM -- A confidant of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu confirmed that the Israeli leader's plan to annex parts of the occupied West Bank would not start Wednesday, the original target date, as the British prime minister made an extraordinary appeal to Israel to call off the plan.

The developments cast further uncertainty over whether Israel will ultimately follow through on the annexation plan, which has drawn international condemnations from some of Israel's closest allies.

Speaking on Israel's Army Radio station, Cabinet minister Ofir Akunis confirmed that the annexation process was on pause, saying that officials were still working out the final details with their American counterparts. He said he expected the annexation to take place later in July.

The prime minister's office issued a statement saying Netanyahu held talks Wednesday with American diplomats and Israeli defense officials on the issue of annexation and that "additional discussions will be held in the coming days."

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The plan, unveiled in January, envisions putting some 30% of the territory under permanent Israeli control, while giving the Palestinians limited autonomy in carved-up pockets of the remaining land.

But the plan has come under stiff international criticism. The United Nations, the European Union and key Arab countries have all said Israel's annexation would violate international law and undermine the already diminished prospects of establishing a viable independent Palestinian state alongside Israel. Even close allies, like Britain, have opposed it.

In a front-page article in the Yediot Ahronot daily, one of Israel's largest newspapers, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson wrote that as a "passionate defender of Israel," he was particularly troubled by its intentions.

"I am fearful that these proposals will fail in their objective of securing Israel's borders and will be contrary to Israel's own long-term interests," Johnson wrote, adding that annexation "would put in jeopardy" the gains Israel has made in recent years in improving relations with the Arab world.

"I profoundly hope that annexation does not go ahead. If it does, the UK will not recognize any changes to the 1967 lines, except those agreed between both parties," he said.

Israel captured the West Bank from Jordan in the 1967 Mideast war. The international community considers the territory occupied land, and Israel's more than 120 settlements there illegal. The Palestinians, who seek all of the West Bank as part of a future state, have rejected the Trump plan.

Several thousand Palestinians marched in Gaza City for a "day of rage" Wednesday to protest the annexation plans, one of several demonstrations that were expected in Palestinian areas. The protesters waved Palestinian flags and held signs calling the plan a "declaration of war" on the Palestinian people. The rally ended peacefully by the early afternoon.

While building scores of settlements that are now home to nearly 500,000 Israelis, Israel has never tried to annex West Bank territory before, saying the area is "disputed" and that its final status should be settled through negotiations. The international community considers the area occupied and its settlements to be illegal.

Information for this article was contributed by Fares Akram of The Associated Press.

Palestinian women chant slogans and flash victory signs as they demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinian women chant slogans and flash victory signs as they demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinian women chant slogans and flash the victory sign as they demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinian women chant slogans and flash the victory sign as they demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinian Hamas leader in the Gaza Strip, Yahya Sinwar, center, attends a demonstration against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinian Hamas leader in the Gaza Strip, Yahya Sinwar, center, attends a demonstration against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends a press briefing with US special envoy for Iran, Brian Hook, while wearing a face mask to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus, at the Prime Minister's office in Jerusalem, Tuesday June 30, 2020. (Abir Sultan/Pool via AP)
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends a press briefing with US special envoy for Iran, Brian Hook, while wearing a face mask to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus, at the Prime Minister's office in Jerusalem, Tuesday June 30, 2020. (Abir Sultan/Pool via AP)
Palestinians demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinians demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Israeli soldiers guard a bus station at the Tapuach junction next to the West Bank city of Nablus, Tuesday, June 30, 2020. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appears determined to carry out his pledge to begin annexing parts of the occupied West Bank, possibly as soon as Wednesday. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
Israeli soldiers guard a bus station at the Tapuach junction next to the West Bank city of Nablus, Tuesday, June 30, 2020. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appears determined to carry out his pledge to begin annexing parts of the occupied West Bank, possibly as soon as Wednesday. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
A Palestinian woman flashes the victory sign as she demonstrates against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
A Palestinian woman flashes the victory sign as she demonstrates against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinians demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinians demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinians demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinians demonstrate against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinian Muslim clerics attend a demonstration against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
Palestinian Muslim clerics attend a demonstration against Israeli plans for the annexation of parts of the West Bank, in Gaza City, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)
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