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The New York Daily News

The virus' economic impacts are being disproportionately borne by women, who made up 46 percent of the U.S. workforce pre-pandemic, but account for 54 percent of jobs lost since the recession began. In September alone, married women lost 1.2 million jobs, while single men gained 1 million jobs.

Why? It's simple and it's complicated. Industries and sectors with the greatest job losses tended to be low-wage and service jobs, disproportionately held by women. Meanwhile, hamstrung by closed schools and cut off from accessing outside child care, adult women with children are dropping out of the workforce or scaling back hours at drastically higher rates than working fathers, to help shoulder family responsibilities.

So it's probably little coincidence that Donald Trump, the man responsible for America's shambolic virus response, is faring poorly in the presidential race among the female electorate.

The longer the pandemic and economic crisis endure, the more all Americans, but especially women, will suffer economically. The current occupant of the White House deserves a sizable share of the blame, but voting him out won't undo the damage. Only far-sighted policy changes can.

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