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story.lead_photo.caption Naomi Osaka, of Japan, holds up the championship trophy after defeating Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, in the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

NEW YORK -- After one errant forehand in the first set of the U.S. Open final, Naomi Osaka looked at her coach in the mostly empty Arthur Ashe Stadium stands with palms up, as if to say, "What the heck is happening?"

In response to another wayward forehand against Victoria Azarenka seconds later, Osaka chucked her racket. It spun a bit and rattled against the court.

Surprisingly off-kilter in the early going Saturday, Osaka kept missing shots and digging herself a deficit. Until, suddenly, she lifted her game, and Azarenka couldn't sustain her start. By the end, Osaka pulled away to a 1-6, 6-3, 6-3 comeback victory for her second U.S. Open championship and third Grand Slam title overall.

"I just thought this would be very embarrassing, to lose this in less than an hour," Osaka said.

A quarter-century had passed since the last time the woman who lost the first set of a U.S. Open final wound up winning: In 1994, Arantxa Sanchez Vicario did it against Steffi Graf.

Gallery: Naomi Osaka wins U.S. Open women's singles

[Gallery not loading above? Click here for more photos » arkansasonline.com/913usopen/]

This one was a back-and-forth affair. Even after Osaka surged ahead 4-1 in the third set, the outcome was unclear. She held four break points in the next game -- convert any of those, and she would have served for the win at 5-1 -- but Azarenka didn't flinch.

Azarenka held there, then broke to get to 4-3.

But Osaka regained control, then covered her face when the final was over.

"I actually don't want to play you in more finals," a smiling Osaka told Azarenka afterward. "I didn't enjoy that."

Osaka, a 22-year-old born in Japan and now based in the United States, added to her trophies from the 2018 U.S. Open -- earned with a brilliant performance in a memorably chaotic final against Serena Williams -- and 2019 Australian Open.

The 23,000-plus seats in the main arena at Flushing Meadows were not entirely unclaimed, just mostly so -- while fans were not allowed to attend because of the coronavirus pandemic, dozens of people who worked at the tournament attended -- and the cavernous place was not entirely silent, just mostly so.

Certainly no thunderous applause that normally would reverberate over and over again through the course of a Grand Slam final, accompanying the players' introductions or preceding the first point or after the greatest of shots.

Instead, a polite smattering of claps from several hands marked such moments.

The win over Azarenka, a 31-year-old from Belarus also seeking a third Grand Slam title but first in 7½ years, made Osaka 11-0 since tennis resumed after its hiatus because of the covid-19 outbreak.

Azarenka won the 2012 and 2013 Australian Opens and lost in the finals of the U.S. Open each of those years.

"I thought the third time was the charm," Azarenka said, "but I guess I'll have to try again."

She carried an 11-match winning streak of her own into Saturday, including a stirring three-set victory over Williams in the semifinals.

And all of three minutes into the final, Azarenka had a break.

She did it with terrific returning, including a sturdy reply to a 119 mph serve to draw a netted forehand; that might have been in Osaka's head when she double-faulted on the following point. And Azarenka did it with let-no-ball-by defense, stretch points until Osaka missed, which she did by slapping a forehand into the net to make it 1-0.

A love hold for Azarenka made it 2-0.

Osaka was making the sort of mistakes she avoided almost entirely in recent matches.

It seemed, in contrast, as if Azarenka couldn't miss, racing into position, always arriving on time, and striking deep groundstrokes to the corners. More often than not, points would end with a mistake from Osaka.

Azarenka broke early in the second set, too, and was up 2-0. The question shifted from "Who will win?" to "Might this be the most lopsided women's final at the U.S. Open since the professional era began in 1968?"

Osaka quickly determined that would not be the case.

She broke back to get on even terms, then again to go ahead 4-3 in the second set when Azarenka's increasing miscues led to a wide backhand.

Here's how Osaka transformed the match: She stepped closer to the baseline, redirecting shots more quickly and forcefully. It didn't help Azarenka that she didn't maintain her form from the first set and began hitting the ball less stridently.

So much of this was about Osaka's transformation from shaky to sure-footed. She had just five winners in the first set, 16 in the second. She also went from 13 unforced errors to merely five.

Naomi Osaka reacts during the U.S. Open women’s singles final against Victoria Azarenka on Saturday. Osaka won 1-6, 6-3, 6-3. More photos online at arkansasonline.com/913usopen.
(AP/Seth Wenig)
Naomi Osaka reacts during the U.S. Open women’s singles final against Victoria Azarenka on Saturday. Osaka won 1-6, 6-3, 6-3. More photos online at arkansasonline.com/913usopen. (AP/Seth Wenig)
Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, reacts during the women's singles final against Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, reacts during the women's singles final against Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
USTA event staff watch play during the women's singles final between Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, and Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
USTA event staff watch play during the women's singles final between Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, and Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, reacts during the women's singles final against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, takes a break between sets against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Naomi Osaka, of Japan, takes a break between sets against Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, during the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, returns a shot to Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, returns a shot to Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, returns a shot to Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Victoria Azarenka, of Belarus, returns a shot to Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the women's singles final of the US Open tennis championships, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

U.S. Open at a glance

At USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center

New York

Surface: Hardcourt outdoor

NEW YORK — Results Saturday from US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center (seedings in parentheses):

WOMEN’S SINGLES

Championship

Naomi Osaka (4), Japan, def. Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, 1-6, 6-3, 6-3.

TODAY’S MEN’S CHAMPIONSHIP

Dominic Thiem vs. Alexander Zverev, 3 p.m.

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