Today's Paper Latest Coronavirus Cooking The Article Families Core Values Story ideas iPad Weather Newsletters Obits Puzzles Archive
ADVERTISEMENT

Names and faces

by The Associated Press | April 6, 2021 at 3:00 a.m.

• Billionaire philanthropists John and Laura Arnold have committed to donate 5% of their wealth annually as part of an effort to encourage increased, timelier donations to charities. The Arnolds, who live in Houston, are the first billionaires to sign on to the advocacy organization Global Citizen's "Give While You Live" campaign, which calls on the world's billionaires to give at least 5% of their wealth every year to a cause. The Arnolds' pledge Monday came as part of an alliance between Global Citizen and the Arnold-led Initiative to Accelerate Charitable Giving -- a coalition of donors, experts and nonprofits who want Congress to raise giving requirements. By agreeing to give 5%, the Arnolds are voluntarily subjecting their assets to the same minimum payment standard private foundations must donate annually to maintain their tax-exempt status. "Right now, many charities are in danger of not surviving the pandemic. Yet, more than $1 trillion promised to them remains warehoused in tax-free investment accounts," John Arnold, the former hedge fund executive turned philanthropist, said in the announcement. "America's charities cannot afford to wait for some larger crisis to arise." The Arnolds have already signed the Giving Pledge, a commitment developed by Bill Gates, his wife Melinda, and Warren Buffett to get the world's richest to give a majority of their wealth during their lifetimes or in their wills.

• U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., was briefly suspended from Twitter on Sunday in what the company said was an error -- its second such mistake in three weeks. Greene was unable to post to her account during the hours-long suspension. The suspension occurred after Greene tweeted about Easter and retweeted a post about abortion. Twitter confirmed the suspension was a mistake made by one of its automated systems. "We use a combination of technology and human review to enforce the Twitter Rules across the service," the San Francisco company said in a prepared statement. "In this case, our automated systems took enforcement action on the account referenced in error." Greene's account was suspended for about 12 hours last month in what the company also said was a mistake. Greene rejected Twitter's explanation. "Twitter suspended me again by 'mistake' yesterday after I tweeted, 'He is risen," Greene wrote on Twitter once the suspension was lifted. "Everyone knows that's a LIE, and it was no mistake." Greene, who has nearly 400,000 Twitter followers, has said most of her most controversial posts were written before she was elected, and that she no longer supports QAnon, the baseless belief that former President Donald Trump waged a secret battle against a cabal of satanic child-molesting cannibals.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsor Content

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT