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OPINION | LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: Unconscionable acts | Sunshine does good | Choices in America

April 7, 2021 at 3:32 a.m.

Unconscionable acts

The apparent lack of vision of Bob Ballinger and a majority of our legislators, including our national delegation, is only surpassed by their vacuous intellect and obsequious feeding at the trough of the NRA and the cult of religion. They have ceased to move forward on any progressive movements to actually help people, improve education, promote voting, or improve people's health. Their focus on suppressing equality is outrageous.

I believe this is the most regressive group of people since before the Civil War. There are not enough adults in the room to counterbalance their inanity, and they plan to keep it that way, thanks to our equally repressive Attorney General Leslie Rutledge for making sure there was no way there would be any balance to bring down gerrymandering.

Our state and our country are moving backward at an alarming rate that is sad to see. I am sure the founders of our country are spinning in their graves. I have never in my 68 years seen such a group of mean-spirited, blatant reprobates running amok. The damage they have done is unconscionable. For a party that supposedly espouses freedom, they have sunk to new lows of oppression.

KEVIN FLEMING

Kingston

Sunshine does good

As we're out enjoying the warm, sunny weather this spring, take a moment to appreciate what good the sunshine has done for our state. Solar energy provides well-paying construction jobs, lowers utility rates, and protects Arkansas' ecosystems. Arkansas ranks 11th in the nation for solar energy potential, and new solar projects across the state are helping the industry grow to meet that potential.

However, access to solar energy in Arkansas is threatened by House Bill 1787. This bill would kill millions of dollars in economic development across Arkansas and eliminate hundreds of jobs. It would unfairly compensate solar owners by forcing them to sell surplus power back to the grid below market rate.

The Solar Access Act of 2019 helped spur a wave of solar construction projects for communities, businesses, and schools in Arkansas. When the Batesville School District switched to solar energy, it was able to recover from a budget deficit and raise teachers' salaries with the money saved. Projects like this would not be feasible if HB1787 were to pass. We cannot afford legislation that harms business development in our state.

When Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed the Solar Access Act in 2019, he said Arkansas is "open for solar business." Altering the Solar Access Act would close the door on millions of dollars of economic development and hundreds of jobs in Arkansas. The Arkansas Legislature should vote no on HB1787. The Solar Access Act is working as intended--don't change it now.

CLAUDIA SMITH

Fayetteville

Choices in America

I believe Georgia has passed a reasonable election law by any standard. Yet, although they probably never read it, much like the president's staffers, certain CEOs find it objectionable. No one elected you, no one voted for you, you do not speak for the American public. The United States is a representative republic, a concept you apparently do not understand. We the people vote for representatives whose values and judgments we share. Did any of you ask your shareholders or customers about your "political" positions? I think not. We have choices in America. How about 75 million people no longer using your services or buying your products?

As to Major League Baseball, did you ask your owners, players or poll your fans before your foolish political move? Did you think about all the low-income people trying to make up their lost wages because of your hasty, ill-thought-out decision? Are you happy you put the first nail in the coffin of MLB? We have choices, people, wake up.

ALBERT HART

Jacksonville

Action anti-children

Our governor had an opportunity to protect children in our state from a woke ideology. I believe Asa Hutchinson failed to show courage by vetoing a bill that protected children from genital mutilation, while choosing to bow down to political correctness.

This veto proves to me that Hutchinson isn't necessarily pro-transgender, but is certainly anti-children. The fact that this subject is considered controversial proves how disorientated our country has become. When children can no longer be protected by irresponsible adults, what can we possibly expect in the future?

DEWEY BARR

Maumelle

That seems only fair

Now that our legislators have passed a bill allowing medical providers the right to refuse treatment to patients based upon their conscience, am I wrong to assume that I can question them about their sexual proclivities before they treat me? Does this work both ways for Arkansans? I've inquired the governor regarding this, but to no avail.

RITA RITCHIE

North Little Rock

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