Today's Paper Latest The Article Story ideas Coronavirus Newsletters Obits Puzzles Archive iPad Core Values Weather
ADVERTISEMENT

OPINION | LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: On personal freedom | Stamp out scourge | Make some changes

August 22, 2021 at 1:50 a.m.

On personal freedom

Arkansas legislators consider a covid mask mandate to be an infringement on personal freedom, apparently.

How do they feel about car seat belts?

W.W. SATTERFIELD

Little Rock

Stamp out scourge

It is obvious that doctors--during surgeries--who wear masks that cover their noses and thus restrict the flow of oxygen to their brains are jeopardizing the lives of their patients. I dare say thousands of children have been killed by this insensitivity to common sense. I don't know how we true patriots have let a danger like this go on for so long, unnoticed. We need to ban the un-American teachings and "kook," "antiseptic surgery" ideas of that foreigner, Dr. Joseph Lister, and soiled sanitation suggestions by that feminist hero, the late Ms. Florence Nightingale. It is obvious now that liberal left-leaning medical elites have been running our medical schools unopposed for far too long.

I'm going to call up governors Greg Abbott, Ron DeSantis, and our own vacillating governor and point out this glaring deficiency to these, our freedom-loving (and politically hungry) politicians. We could possibly stamp this Chinese scourge out in a month, just like Donald Trump said we could, if we stay true to the anti-mask mantra laid out for us by Fox News and duplicate "The Florida Experiment" in the other backward 49 states. And who knows, we might even edge Governor Hutchinson back on track to the straight and narrow road to religious correctness on this mask-wearing matter.

But it is also obvious we may need several booster shots for this deadly reason-resistant "pro-mask-anti-common-sense-scourge" sweeping the nation in order to finally vanquish it and kick mask-wearing to the rubbish bin of history where it belongs.

DANNY HANCOCK

Lonoke

Make some changes

I believe President John F. Kennedy said it best when he said, "Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country." I believe that without realizing it, Americans start to lose this ideal. We indeed elect officials to represent us in Congress but at the same time we need to understand that they are not going to do everything for us. My time with the Borgen Project has helped me understand that we do not have to sit idly by while others make decisions on our behalf. Our representatives want to hear from us. They need to hear from us on the issues we want to see resolved.

We must educate ourselves on the issues that being discussed on Capitol Hill such as the COVAX initiative, the Reach Every Mother and Child Act, and the Girls Lead Act. These will not only affect us but people all over the world. The question of today would be how. How are we able to show our representatives which issues we want to see support on? It is quite easy. On behalf of the Borgen Project, I have been making calls to their offices telling them where I want to see support. It takes no time at all to give a quick phone call.

I have received letters from representatives after I call to let me know that they are indeed listening, so it is time to pick up the phone and become an active citizen. Be the change and make some changes.

KIARA BRADFORD

Conway

Can gain credibility

Have been reading John Brummett's columns bemoaning the deficiencies of the Republican candidates to be our next governor. I would suggest another candidate: Tom Cotton should throw his hat in the ring.

There has been plenty of talk that Senator Cotton is planning to run for president in 2024. I would be much more inclined to vote for him if I could see he had some successful executive government experience--unlike the last man we elected president.

Years ago Ronald Reagan's adversaries derided him as "just a B-actor," the star of "Bedtime for Bonzo." His supporters rebutted that by pointing out that he had had eight years of experience successfully running the largest state in the country. Cotton would only gain credibility if he had only two years running our small state.

EDWARD TABLER

Fayetteville

Dreams up in flames

Former President Trump is truly a genius at manipulating his loyal supporters. If he disparages mask-wearing, they will die for him. If he claims, without evidence, that the election was stolen, that becomes their unshakable "truth." If he encourages them to attack the Capitol, tragically they do so, thinking they are heroic patriots. Without consequences, he goes to Mar-a-Lago; they go to prison.

Trumpist epistemology is basically, "Don't believe your eyes, ears or reason, but only the lies I tell you; otherwise you are the enemy of the people." Congressional Republicans should ponder if this will become their legacy: "When truth and democracy were under siege, and genuine patriots were desperately needed, I abandoned my constitutional oath and shamelessly hid in the dark shadow of Donald Trump."

The insurrectionists on Jan. 6 believed that they were "true patriots" while committing felonies by using American flags to bludgeon Capitol police officers. Such a total loss of reality perspective illustrates the danger when a talented demagogue casts his manipulative spell on supporters' dreams, fears and anger.

It is ironic that devout Christians could support this truth-denying, hate-engendering style of politics. Trump's loyalty is not to marital partners, his supporters, the spirit of Christianity or the Constitution, but only to his laser-focused pursuit of power, revenge and fortune. Transactional selling of the soul for shiny political policy bribes from a dangerous demagogue is not a moral high road.

Putin and Xi must be smiling about Mr. Trump's remarkable success at fanning the flames of partisan hatred that so effectively weakens the strength and soul of America. If we genuinely care about our freedom, we must always stand up first for truth and democratic principles and only then for partisan preference. If truth dies and the fire of partisan hatred ignites, all of our dreams will surely go up in flames.

JERRY HENDERSON

Little Rock

Governor candidates

Note to Richard Newberg: I am not wild about the choices for governor either, but I think maybe you should go back to Michigan.

JUDITH JONES

Hot Springs Village

Print Headline: Letters

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsor Content

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT