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Barty, Collins face off for Australian Open title

by The Associated Press | January 28, 2022 at 2:20 a.m.
Ash Barty reacts after defeating Madison Keys in their semifinal match at the Australian Open in Melbourne. Barty is the first Australian woman to advance to an Australian Open final since Wendy Turnbull in 1980. “As an Aussie, we’re exceptionally spoiled we get to play in our own backyard,” Barty said. “Now we have a chance to play for a title. It’s unreal.” (AP/Hamish Blair)

MELBOURNE, Australia -- Ashleigh Barty was the crowd favorite at Melbourne Park long before she ended a 42-year drought by reaching the Australian Open final.

Danielle Collins said it'll be "spectacular" to take on the women's No. 1-ranked player in the final of her home Grand Slam event on Saturday.

The 28-year-old American got a little taste of what to expect in her first Grand Slam final as she left the court on Thursday following her 6-4, 6-1 semifinal win over seventh-seeded Iga Swiatek.

Barty beat Madison Keys 6-1, 6-3 in 62 minutes in the first of the semifinals, and Collins wrapped up the night by beating 2020 French Open champion Swiatek in 78 minutes.

Predictably, there were boos after Collins finished her on-court TV interview. Not too loud or long, but an indication of things to come nonetheless.

Barty won her first major title on clay at Roland Garros in 2019 and her second on grass at Wimbledon last year. Now that she's become the first Australian woman into the final here since Wendy Turnbull in 1980, Barty has a good chance to claim her first on a hard court. She's only too aware, though, that no Australian woman since Chris O'Neil in 1978 has won the singles title here.

"As an Aussie, we're exceptionally spoiled we get to play in our own backyard," the 25-year-old Barty said. "Now we have a chance to play for a title. It's unreal."

Barty lost to eventual champion Sofia Kenin in 2020 the last time she reached the Australian Open semifinals. She said she's learned from that kind of pressure as much as winning other Grand Slams.

"Absolutely embrace it," she said of the home expectations. "You have to. It's fun. It's brilliant to be playing in the business end of your home Slam. I'm not gonna lie about that -- it's amazing."

Keys is just the latest in a line of rivals to explain how she had few answers to Barty's slice backhand and wide variety of serves.

Barty hit 20 winners to only eight for Keys, who was playing in the Australian Open semifinals for the first time since 2015. She lost that year to eventual champion Serena Williams, who was the last No. 1 seed to win the women's title at Melbourne Park.

Barty converted four of her six break-point opportunities and saved the only two break points she faced on her serve against the 2017 U.S. Open champion runner-up. In six matches so far at the tournament, she has dropped one service game.

The 27th-seeded Collins relies on a power game and imposes a relentless energy on every contest.

Her forehand cross-court winner to set up her first match points was typical of her semifinal form. She hit 27 winners and had only 13 unforced errors. She opened each set with a break of serve and raced to 4-0 leads both times.

Collins delayed her professional career by playing in the U.S. college system, and said it gave her a good grounding in handling what she calls "adverse" crowds.

Playing in empty stadiums during the covid-19 pandemic has given her an appreciation of crowds, whether the fans support her, are against her or are neutral.

"That's something that I really thrive in, whether I have a full crowd going for me or whether I have the opposite," she said. "I really just love the energy. I'm just really excited to go out there and compete.

"I realize that there is going to be a lot of people supporting Ash. It's all in good spirit."

  photo  Danielle Collins of the U.S. reacts after winning a point against Iga Swiatek of Poland during their semifinal match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. (AP Photo/Hamish Blair)
 
 
  photo  Supporters of Australia's Ash Barty hold up signs of support during her semifinal against Madison Keys of the U.S. at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. (AP Photo/Hamish Blair)
 
 
  photo  Madison Keys of the U.S. plays a forehand return to Ash Barty of Australia during their semifinal match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)
 
 
  photo  Danielle Collins of the U.S. plays a backhand return to Iga Swiatek of Poland during their semifinal match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. (AP Photo/Hamish Blair)
 
 
  photo  Ash Barty of Australia plays a forehand return to Madison Keys of the U.S. during their semifinal match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)
 
 
  photo  Madison Keys of the U.S. reacts after losing a point to Ash Barty of Australia during their semifinal match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. (AP Photo/Hamish Blair)
 
 
  photo  Ash Barty, left, of Australia, is congratulated by Madison Keys of the U.S. following their semifinal match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)
 
 
  photo  Danielle Collins of the U.S. reacts after winning a point against Iga Swiatek of Poland during their semifinal match at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2022. (AP Photo/Tertius Pickard)
 
 

Print Headline: Barty, Collins face off for Australian Open title

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