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OPINION | LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: 'Good' conservatives? | That was unexpected | Preparing for the war

November 20, 2022 at 1:40 a.m.


'Good' conservatives?

How can anyone support Sarah H.S., Tom Cotton, French Hill, John Boozman, Jason Rapert, etc., when they supported a man, D.T., who allegedly defiled women, said that covid would just go away, and implied you could just inject a disinfectant into your body? Thousands of people died in America because of his lack of understanding and slow response to the pandemic. And after his refusal to accept the election result, he incited the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on our Capitol, and gave support to radicals and extremists.

Is this what a good conservative would do? This is way-too-right extremism, anti-democracy, and denial of factual scientific information. A total conservative would still believe the Earth is flat, our planet is the center of the universe, and the Earth is only a few thousand years old. To be a "liberal" is bad and a "conservative" is always good.

The truth is somewhere in between these two extremes; maybe the word is pragmatic, logical, able to see all sides of an issue, and not using the Bible to preach and teach hatred, that every issue is black or white, nothing in between, no shades of gray are possible. You can't use the biblical text as a science book. I'm sorry, but too many so-called good Christians are bigoted and full of bias toward people and don't really understand the issues and facts. They can be blinded by their misplaced faith. And I'm afraid many Republicans are in this boat in a mythical ocean on a threatened and fragile planet. Ignorance is bliss, and it might get you elected whether you truly believe or not.

L.D. BINTLIFF

Bee Branch

That was unexpected

Re the story on Fiocchi expanding at the Port of Little Rock: How refreshing--objective business reporting with nary a direct mention of Second Amendment tolerance or school shootings.

GORDON S. BYRD

El Dorado

Preparing for the war

John Brummett speculated as to the direction Sarah Sanders might take when she becomes our governor. Personally, I'm anticipating a renewal of the War on Christmas.

I can't remember if we won or if we lost, just that it was kind of entertaining.

PATTY BESOM

Fayetteville

Monument to tragedy

I hope that readers of the Democrat-Gazette are now aware of the Sultana story. In April of 1865 our country had just ended the deadliest war in American history. During the war, newspapers were filled with stories of loss of life. By President Lincoln's assassination on April 14, 1865, nearly all families suffered personal loss to war.

On May 5, 1865, a Memphis Argus article appeared, the reporter writing of numbness to death: "We have, as a people, become so accustomed to suffering of horrors during the past few years that they soon seem to lose their appalling features. ... Only a few days ago, 1,500 lives were sacrificed to fire and water, almost within sight of the city. Yet, even now, the disaster is scarcely mentioned--some new excitement has taken its place."

The survivors tried to keep the story alive, petitioning Congress every session from 1887-1914 to have a monument placed along the Mississippi River commemorating the disaster. They failed. Some survivors became bitter for our government's failure to acknowledge this disaster.

Sgt. James H. Kimberlin of the 124th Indiana Infantry, not long before he died in 1924, summed up the bitterness, writing: "The men who had endured the torments of a hell on Earth, starved, famished from thirst, eaten with vermin, having endured all the indignities, insults and abuses possible for an armed bully to bestow upon them, to be so soon forgotten does not speak well for our government or the American people."

Thank you, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, for covering the Sultana Disaster Museum groundbreaking. It has been almost 100 years since Sergeant Kimberlin wrote of his bitterness. There will finally be a "monument" in the form of a museum that tells the full story of the Sultana and her soldiers.

JOHN N. FOGLEMAN

Marion

Stadium distressing

We recently attended a Razorback football game in Fayetteville. My husband has developed ambulatory/standing disabilities. Since there are no dropoff locations at the stadium for disabled fans, we had to use handicapped parking, which is several blocks away from the stadium. Bus transportation was provided, but we stood in a long line coming and going, None of the buses accommodated wheelchairs.

The return buses to the lot were located only at the southeast corner of the stadium. Those disabled fans who were seated on the other side of the stadium had an extremely arduous journey to the bus. And while there are ramps in common areas of the stadium, many have no handrails and are too steep for wheelchairs to navigate. We were unable to find any wheelchair-accessible seats. The University of Arkansas stadium cannot possibly meet the criteria of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).

Additionally, there was a slight snow the night before. No attempt was made to remove snow and ice in the stadium where we sat. In fact, the stairs to our seats were covered in ice, and the area where our feet rested was covered with ice. This made the temperature colder and made it impossible to stand to watch a play or cheer.

Also, the volume of the speakers was so loud you could not understand the words of the announcer or lyrics of the music. Audio was played so loud that it often removed any fan spontaneity; the once-famous Hog call was limited to four times the whole game. Cheers attempted by cheerleaders and fans were drowned out by the over-zealous music maestro.

This game was a distressing experience. The University of Arkansas must do better.

JUDY KERR

Little Rock

Welcome spot to rest

A belated thank you to Ben V. Floriani IV of BSA Troop 27. In 2019, Ben built/installed three park benches at Meriwether Park near the walking trail. As a senior citizen who walks that trail daily, it helps to have a short break.

DEE EANES

Little Rock


Print Headline: Letters

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