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The world in brief: Kin ask for Nepal crash victims’ bodies

by Compiled by Democrat-Gazette Staff From Wire Reports | January 19, 2023 at 3:34 a.m.
Relatives and friends perform last rites of a plane crash victim, Wednesday in Pokhara, Nepal. (AP/Yunish Gurung)

Kin ask for Nepal crash victims' bodies

POKHARA, Nepal -- Grieving relatives of plane crash victims in Nepal were growing impatient as they waited for authorities to conduct autopsies and hand over the bodies for cremation.

The Yeti Airlines flight with 72 aboard plummeted into a gorge on Sunday while on approach to the newly opened Pokhara International Airport in the foothills of the Himalayas. There were no survivors.

"It has been four days, but no one is listening to us," Madan Kumar Jaiswal said on Wednesday, as he waited outside the Tribhuvan University Institute of Medicine.

He said he wanted the post-mortem to be done quickly so that the families can receive the bodies of their loved ones.

"They are saying that they will do a DNA test. My daughter is dead," said Ashok Rayamagi, father of another victim.

Authorities did not comment on the autopsies Wednesday, but several of the bodies were reported to be badly burned.

Some aviation experts said footage from the ground of the plane's last moments indicated the aircraft went into a stall, although it's unclear why.

The search for the only remaining missing person resumed on Wednesday with the help of divers and drones, police said. Workers had shut down a dam on the Seti River to help them look for the body in the 984-foot-deep ravine.

Court clears Fukushima plant executives

TOKYO -- A Japanese court on Wednesday found three former utility company executives innocent of negligence over the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster and the subsequent deaths of more than 40 elderly residents during their forced evacuation.

The Tokyo High Court ruling upheld a 2019 lower court decision that also acquitted the three former top officials of Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, saying that a tsunami of the size that hit the plant was unforeseeable and the executives could not be held negligent.

The case is the only criminal trial related to the nuclear accident, in which a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and massive tsunami hit the plant, knocking out its cooling systems and causing three reactors to melt. A large amount of radiation was released into surrounding communities and the sea, causing tens of thousands of residents to lose their homes, jobs and community ties.

The court said ex-TEPCO Chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata, 82, and two other former executives were not guilty of causing the deaths of 44 elderly patients whose already waning health deteriorated during or after forced evacuations from a local hospital and a nursing home.

The executives were accused of failing to anticipate the earthquake and tsunami that struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant on March 11, 2011, and of failing to take measures that might have saved the plant. The tsunami was as high as 56 feet at some locations.

Blinken: Iran rejected U.S. nuclear deal

WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State Antony Blinken said Iran had rejected the chance to return to a nuclear deal with the U.S. months ago, and he reiterated that a new agreement was no longer a Biden administration priority.

Blinken said the U.S. had the consent of Russia, China and the other original signatories to the 2015 agreement, which President Donald Trump abandoned in 2018.

Iran balked, Blinken added.

"The Iranians killed the opportunity to come back to that agreement swiftly many months ago," Blinken said at a press conference in Washington alongside U.K. Foreign Secretary James Cleverly on Tuesday. "There was an opportunity on the table that they rejected, an opportunity that was approved by all who were involved."

The U.S. has all but given up on new talks, especially in the wake of Iran's crackdown on nationwide protests that erupted after the death of a young woman in police custody last year.

Mexico reviews 'El Chapo' plea to return

MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's president said Wednesday his government will consider a plea by imprisoned drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman to be returned to Mexico, presumably to serve out his sentence.

Guzman, 64, was sentenced to life behind bars in the United States for a drug conspiracy that spread murder and mayhem for more than two decades.

Guzman has lived in poor conditions in prison since his 2019 conviction, said Jose Refugio Rodriguez, a Mexican lawyer who claims to represent him. Rodríguez told local media that Guzman hasn't had adequate access to sunlight, visits, good food or medical care.

The Mexican Embassy in Washington said in its Twitter account that it had received an email from Rodriguez about the issue and had turned it over to Mexico's foreign relations department.

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said "we will review it," adding: "You always have to keep the door open when it comes to human rights."

  photo  French investigators inspect the wreckage of a passenger plane at the crash site, in Pokhara, Nepal, Wednesday, Jan.18, 2023. Nepalese authorities are returning to families the bodies of plane crash victims and are sending the aircraft's data recorder to France for analysis as they try to determine what caused the country's deadliest air accident in 30 years. The flight plummeted into a gorge on Sunday while on approach to the newly opened Pokhara International Airport in the foothills of the Himalayas, killing all 72 aboard. (AP Photo/Yunish Gurung)
 
 
  photo  French investigators inspect the site of a plane crash, in Pokhara, Nepal, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2023. Nepalese authorities are returning to families the bodies of plane crash victims and are sending the aircraft's data recorder to France for analysis as they try to determine what caused the country's deadliest air accident in 30 years. The flight plummeted into a gorge on Sunday while on approach to the newly opened Pokhara International Airport in the foothills of the Himalayas, killing all 72 aboard. (AP Photo/Yunish Gurung)
 
 
  photo  French investigators inspect the wreckage of a passenger plane at the crash site, in Pokhara, Nepal, Wednesday, Jan.18, 2023. Nepalese authorities are returning to families the bodies of plane crash victims and are sending the aircraft's data recorder to France for analysis as they try to determine what caused the country's deadliest air accident in 30 years. The flight plummeted into a gorge on Sunday while on approach to the newly opened Pokhara International Airport in the foothills of the Himalayas, killing all 72 aboard.(AP Photo/Yunish Gurung)
 
 
  photo  A French investigator takes a photo of the wreckage of a passenger plane at the crash site, in Pokhara, Nepal, Wednesday, Jan.18, 2023. Nepalese authorities are returning to families the bodies of plane crash victims and are sending the aircraft's data recorder to France for analysis as they try to determine what caused the country's deadliest air accident in 30 years. The flight plummeted into a gorge on Sunday while on approach to the newly opened Pokhara International Airport in the foothills of the Himalayas, killing all 72 aboard.(AP Photo/Yunish Gurung)
 
 
  photo  Relatives and friends of Indian national Sanjay Jaiswal, a plane crash victim, wait outside a hospital to receive the body, in Katmandu, Nepal, Wednesday, Jan.18, 2023. Nepalese authorities are returning to families the bodies of plane crash victims and are sending the aircraft's data recorder to France for analysis as they try to determine what caused the country's deadliest air accident in 30 years. The flight plummeted into a gorge on Sunday while on approach to the newly opened Pokhara International Airport in the foothills of the Himalayas, killing all 72 aboard. (AP Photo/Bikram Rai)
 
 
  photo  Buddhist monks pray for the plane crash victims, at the crash site, in Pokhara, Nepal, Wednesday, Jan.18, 2023. Nepalese authorities are returning to families the bodies of plane crash victims and are sending the aircraft's data recorder to France for analysis as they try to determine what caused the country's deadliest air accident in 30 years. The flight plummeted into a gorge on Sunday while on approach to the newly opened Pokhara International Airport in the foothills of the Himalayas, killing all 72 aboard.(AP Photo/Yunish Gurung)
 
 

Print Headline: Kin ask for Nepal crash victims’ bodies Court clears Fukushima plant executives Blinken: Iran rejected U.S. nuclear deal Mexico reviews ‘El Chapo’ plea to return

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