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Mystery plants: Achimenes, Brazilian Snapdragon and Bolivian Sage

by Janet B. Carson October 2, 2022 at 3:18 p.m.
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Achimenes are tender perennials for us in Arkansas. The plant will go dormant in the fall, and if you protect the pot that the tubers are growing in, they will come back the next year.  The dried tubers can be lifted and stored, but most commonly, they are left in the container, which can be stored in the garage or home for the winter.  It does best outdoors with morning sun and afternoon shade, or in filtered sunlight. They can bloom all summer.  I had never seen any this color before. These were growing in the conservatory at Longwood. 

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In the past, I have seen various shades of purples. 

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Brazilian Snapdragon - Achetaria azurea.

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These 3 foot by 3 foot tropical flowering plants were in the garden at Longwood. I had never seen them before,  but will look for it next spring. The flowers are said to resemble snapdragons (thus the common name).  The plants were covered in blooms and were quie showy.  The two petalled blossoms had a stread of white at the throat of the bloom.

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 They are considered a summer annual, blooming from mid-summer through fall.  If you had them, they would need to be brought inside for the winter.

Bolivian Sage or Fuzzy Brazilian sage

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are the common names for Salvia oxyphora.  Native to the foothills of the Andes, this perennial salvia plant starts booming with fuzzy, hot pink blossoms from early summer through fall.  The fuzziness is actually tiny white hairs that give it that appearance.

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 It will grow in full sun to partial shade, but in Arkansas would prefer a bit of afternoon shade. 


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