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Why not Batesville?

Ozark Foothills FilmFest visitors don't wade into the town's culture, but they don't skate across it, either

By Kyle Brazzel

This article was published April 6, 2008 at 6:00 a.m.

jody-hughes-plays-ukulele-for-the-benefit-of-cafe-patrons-at-a-mixer-for-ozark-foothills-filmfest-guests-including-sean-tracey-and-sandy-qualls-tracey-second-from-right-is-a-filmmaker-from-new-hampshire-who-traveled-to-batesville-to-screen-his-documentary-the-jesus-guy

Jody Hughes plays ukulele for the benefit of cafe patrons at a mixer for Ozark Foothills FilmFest guests, including Sean Tracey and Sandy Qualls. Tracey (second from right) is a filmmaker from New Hampshire who traveled to Batesville to screen his documentary The Jesus Guy

— The exchanges loop in circular befuddlement like a "who's on first?" routine as filmed by Cecil B. De Mille: A serene, hirsute man dressed in a flowing garment responds to the question "What's your name?" with the answer "What's Your Name?"

After a few repeat-after-me rounds, the robed man clarifies: "I'm known by the question."

In Sean Tracey's documentary, which was shown March 29 at the Ozark Foothills FilmFest in this small, conservative river town of just under 10,000, What's Your Name is better known by the film's title, The Jesus Guy - a humble wanderer who dresses, travels and lives by the standards of Christ, seeming never to let the mask slip and reveal a performer within.

Bob Pest, the Batesville man who programs and directs Batesville's film festival and introduces each presentation personally, had good reason to believe The Jesus Guy would play well there.

For more information see today's Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

Subscribers can read the story here on ArkansasOnline.

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