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Tests show dicamba's volatility

UA researchers say newest herbicides capable of drifting

By Stephen Steed

This article was published August 12, 2017 at 1:52 a.m.

farmers-and-agriculture-industry-workers-walk-through-a-mississippi-county-soybean-field-tuesday-at-the-university-of-arkansas-northeast-research-and-extension-center-in-keiser-during-uas-annual-field-day

Farmers and agriculture industry workers walk through a Mississippi County soybean field Tuesday at the University of Arkansas’ Northeast Research and Extension Center in Keiser during UA’s annual “field day.”

Jason Norsworthy, a University of Arkansas weed scientist, talked to field day visitors in Keiser about the tendency of the herbicide dicamba to drift...

The newest dicamba herbicides on the market -- approved by federal regulators less than a year ago -- are volatile, but less volatile than the older formulations that have always been illegal for in-crop use, according to recent tests by scientists with the University of Arkansas Agriculture Division.

Jason Norsworthy, a University of Arkansas weed scientist, talked to field day visitors in Keiser about the tendency of the herbicide dicamba to drift...

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